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The Black Moth by Georgette Heyer
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The Black Moth (original 1921; edition 2009)

by Georgette Heyer

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1,101247,536 (3.57)92
Member:tbroomfield
Title:The Black Moth
Authors:Georgette Heyer
Info:Sourcebooks Casablanca (2009), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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The Black Moth by Georgette Heyer (1921)

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» See also 92 mentions

English (23)  German (1)  All languages (24)
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
http://librivox.org/the-black-moth-by-georgette-heyer/
I started out enjoying the overwrought melodrama but it began to drag in the middle and just got lost in a haze of food and dress details, as well as way too much overly ornate dialouge. It still had some good moments by the end but I was mostly glad to have it done.
  amyem58 | Jul 3, 2014 |
so, so slashy. *fond* ( )
  sageness | Feb 7, 2014 |
Heyer's first novel, and not one of her best. The writing itself is fine, but the characters are one-dimensional, and the plot is aggravating. ( )
  thatotter | Feb 6, 2014 |
I liked the humour in "The Black Moth", especially Lady Lavinia's dialogue. In reality this type of character would be quite maddening, but in a novel most entertaining.

Although I didn't find this tale a gripping one, I did find it entertaining, and it made a refreshing change. It is essentially "light" throughout, focusing on social occasions, material desire, love, and honour, though there is the odd dark moment too.

Great characterisation and a simple plot sums up my opinion of this novel. It was my first taste of Georgette Heyer and will certainly sample more of her historical fiction in future.

Any one in two minds about reading "The Black Moth" should do as I did and head over to Project Gutenberg and download the e-book for free. ( )
  PhilSyphe | Oct 16, 2013 |
As much as I enjoyed this book, it isn't one of my favorites by Heyer. I can partly put the blame on the blurb - I was expecting more in regards to Jack Carstares and Diana Beauleigh. Unfortunately, these two don't even meet until halfway through the book!

No, the plot of this book revolves around other characters. There is Tracy, the Duke of Andover. He's the villain of this book, he's the Black Moth (as one character describes him). You see, Tracy was vital in Jack being ostracized from polite society, wrongfully ostracized. You see, at a party (six years before our story begins), Jack's younger brother was caught playing cards with a marked deck. Back in the day, there's nothing worse than having your honour questioned, and Tracy questions Richard's honour...and Jack stepped in and claimed he marked the deck. So Jack was shunned.

And now Tracy thinks he has fallen in love and he attempts to kidnap the object of his affections in order to force her to marry him. Sounds like quite a likable fellow, don't you think?

Instead Jack, who has been playing at being a highwayman for the past few years, interrupts the kidnapping and saves Diana. Injured in the rescue attempt, Diana and her family house Jack during his recovery. And so a few chapters is given over to Diana and Jack falling in love.

I found that switch in writing styles from contemporary historicals somewhat odd to deal with. And it served to remind me that you can't hold Heyer's writing to modern standards. At least with this novel you have to. Her other books I've read have always heavily portrayed the H/H throughout the whole novel. The Black Moth is more of an ensemble piece...think of the movie Love, Actually - many little stories put together. That's how this book works.

Other strong characters are Jack's younger brother and his wife, Lavinia, an extremely selfish woman.

And now that I've told you what to expect, hopefully you won't go into this book with the same expectations I did.

The Black Moth gets a 4 out of 5 from me. I did enjoy it, but it's not Heyer's strongest. ( )
  ames | Sep 30, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Georgette Heyerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Palmer, DianaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rhind Tutt, JulianNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Clad in his customary black and silver, with raven hair unpowdered and elaborately dressed, diamonds on his fingers and in his cravat, Hugh Tracy Clare Belmanoir, Duke of Andover, sat at the escritoire in the library of his town house, writing.
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Book description
THE HIGHWAYMAN'S LADY

Disguised as a highwayman, Jack Carstares, the wrongly disgraced Earl of Wyncham, found himself again face-to-face with the wicked Duke of Andover. This time the Black Moth was attempting to abduct dark-haired beauty Diana Beauleigh. Once more Jack's noble impulse to save the day landed him in trouble, but not before sending the villainous duke scurrying. Diana took her gallant rescuer in and nursed his wounds, and soon truer emotions grew between them. But Jack couldn't stay, for a lady and an outlaw would make a scandalous pair. Torn between his tarnished past and the hope for Diana's hand, Jack had one dangerous chance to reclaim his honor -- by defeating the Black Moth for good!
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0373835582, Mass Market Paperback)

THE HIGHWAYMAN'S LADY

Disguised as a highwayman, Jack Carstares, the wrongly disgraced Earl of Wyncham, found himself again face-to-face with the wicked Duke of Andover. This time the Black Moth was attempting to abduct dark-haired beauty Diana Beauleigh. Once more Jack's noble impulse to save the day landed him in trouble, but not before sending the villainous duke scurrying. Diana took her gallant rescuer in and nursed his wounds, and soon truer emotions grew between them. But Jack couldn't stay, for a lady and an outlaw would make a scandalous pair. Torn between his tarnished past and the hope for Diana's hand, Jack had one dangerous chance to reclaim his honor -- by defeating the Black Moth for good!

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:02:46 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"Seven years before our story opens, Carstares protected his brother by allowing himself to be disgraced for cheating at cards. His brother, suffering intense guilt, isn't aware that they played right into the hands of the Duke of Andover. The disgraced Earl now roams the countryside until a confrontation with his rival thwarts the attempt to kidnap the lovely Diana. But now the Duke is more determined than ever to have Diana for his own, and the two men will meet at sword point before the Earl's name can be cleared and he can claim his fair lady"--Publisher's Web site.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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