HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Black Moth by Georgette Heyer
Loading...

The Black Moth (original 1921; edition 2009)

by Georgette Heyer

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,113267,423 (3.58)99
Member:tbroomfield
Title:The Black Moth
Authors:Georgette Heyer
Info:
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

The Black Moth by Georgette Heyer (1921)

Recently added byloriephillips, Bjace, peterpobre, anglemark, private library, blatherlikeme, hmskip, rooner, yarnbeagle

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 99 mentions

English (25)  German (1)  All languages (26)
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
I quite like it. Lavina - all the Belmanoirs - are utter idiots in various ways - very spoiled. They've never had to deal with the consequences of their choices...but two of them learn that lesson by the end of the book. Dick is a different kind of idiot, one who is extremely familiar with consequences - but again, by the end of the book he's progressed quite a bit. And Jack and Diana are sweet (though Jack is yet another type of idiot - but a heroic one). I like Jim, actually - obsessively loyal for very good reason. And Miles and Molly, too. The story is quite silly - false names and pride and playing at highwayman - and leans a bit too heavily on coincidence at several points (why _were_ his pistols unloaded?). But it makes a nice stage for the characters to play out their games. They're not particularly well-rounded - more like well-done puppets - but it's definitely worth reading, and rereading (I recognized a few scenes as I came across them, though I didn't remember the story as a whole). ( )
  jjmcgaffey | Aug 5, 2014 |
Created for her sickly brother when she was 17 and published a couple of years later, this was Heyer's first novel which started her on her prolific career. A light adventure story, this is a Georgian romp with one of those heavy, lazy eye-lidded arrogant characters I dislike who - fortunately for me - turns out to be the villain instead of the hero.

Though the prologue and epilogue focus on 'Devil' Beaumanoir (the 'Black Moth' of the title; a phrase used only once within the entire text), the body of the story concerns the lifestyles and romantic interests of the Carstares brothers : John, known as Jack, who had forsaken society and gone into exile to prevent the disgrace of his younger brother, Richard, who has since given up his vices in remorse - despite the best efforts of his wife, Lavinia (who happens to be Beaumanoir's sister), to get him to live more of a high life.

Jack has recently returned to England to the life of a gentleman highwayman despite pleas from friends and family to return to his new position as Earl of Wyncham. His 'profession' does, however, put him in position to rescue two damsels in distress, thus introducing the requisite romance.

Though this was quite fun to read and much better than the usual 'Regency romance' genre (as much, I personally feel, as Jane Austen is out of Heyer's league), it does have its flaws for me. For instance, the prologue and epilogue felt like they were tacked on as an afterthoughts, only serving to show us the concern that the Honourable Frank Fortescue has for his friend, Devil, the basis for which neither I nor Devil, nor even Fortescue himself understand.

What really annoyed me, though, was the casual attitude of almost the entire cast (including the intended victim) to the attempted crimes, which would get some serious jail time in this day and age. And I was a bit disappointed that the villain of the piece doesn't get what I think is his just comeuppance.

3 stars ( )
  libraian | Jul 6, 2014 |
http://librivox.org/the-black-moth-by-georgette-heyer/
I started out enjoying the overwrought melodrama but it began to drag in the middle and just got lost in a haze of food and dress details, as well as way too much overly ornate dialouge. It still had some good moments by the end but I was mostly glad to have it done.
  amyem58 | Jul 3, 2014 |
so, so slashy. *fond* ( )
  sageness | Feb 7, 2014 |
Heyer's first novel, and not one of her best. The writing itself is fine, but the characters are one-dimensional, and the plot is aggravating. ( )
  thatotter | Feb 6, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Georgette Heyerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Palmer, DianaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rhind Tutt, JulianNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Clad in his customary black and silver, with raven hair unpowdered and elaborately dressed, diamonds on his fingers and in his cravat, Hugh Tracy Clare Belmanoir, Duke of Andover, sat at the escritoire in the library of his town house, writing.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
THE HIGHWAYMAN'S LADY

Disguised as a highwayman, Jack Carstares, the wrongly disgraced Earl of Wyncham, found himself again face-to-face with the wicked Duke of Andover. This time the Black Moth was attempting to abduct dark-haired beauty Diana Beauleigh. Once more Jack's noble impulse to save the day landed him in trouble, but not before sending the villainous duke scurrying. Diana took her gallant rescuer in and nursed his wounds, and soon truer emotions grew between them. But Jack couldn't stay, for a lady and an outlaw would make a scandalous pair. Torn between his tarnished past and the hope for Diana's hand, Jack had one dangerous chance to reclaim his honor -- by defeating the Black Moth for good!
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0373835582, Mass Market Paperback)

THE HIGHWAYMAN'S LADY

Disguised as a highwayman, Jack Carstares, the wrongly disgraced Earl of Wyncham, found himself again face-to-face with the wicked Duke of Andover. This time the Black Moth was attempting to abduct dark-haired beauty Diana Beauleigh. Once more Jack's noble impulse to save the day landed him in trouble, but not before sending the villainous duke scurrying. Diana took her gallant rescuer in and nursed his wounds, and soon truer emotions grew between them. But Jack couldn't stay, for a lady and an outlaw would make a scandalous pair. Torn between his tarnished past and the hope for Diana's hand, Jack had one dangerous chance to reclaim his honor -- by defeating the Black Moth for good!

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:02:46 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"Seven years before our story opens, Carstares protected his brother by allowing himself to be disgraced for cheating at cards. His brother, suffering intense guilt, isn't aware that they played right into the hands of the Duke of Andover. The disgraced Earl now roams the countryside until a confrontation with his rival thwarts the attempt to kidnap the lovely Diana. But now the Duke is more determined than ever to have Diana for his own, and the two men will meet at sword point before the Earl's name can be cleared and he can claim his fair lady"--Publisher's Web site.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.58)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 21
2.5 5
3 80
3.5 25
4 84
4.5 6
5 40

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,379,122 books! | Top bar: Always visible