HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren
Loading...

Lab Girl (edition 2016)

by Hope Jahren (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,492907,809 (4.11)175
Jahren has built three laboratories in which she's studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. She tells about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom's labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and the disappointments, triumphs and exhilarating discoveries of scientific work. Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world. Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she's studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life but it is also so much more. "Lab Girl" is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren's remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom's labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done with both the heart and the hands; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work. Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home. Jahren's probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. "Lab Girl" opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be. -- Publisher description.… (more)
Member:msbaba
Title:Lab Girl
Authors:Hope Jahren (Author)
Info:Knopf (2016), 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 175 mentions

English (88)  Spanish (2)  All languages (90)
Showing 1-5 of 88 (next | show all)
This is the memoir of a woman scientist -- a botanist -- and it is a terrific read. The author is an unusual person with unusual passions, and unusual relationships. She writes, quite beautifully, about growing up in a cold family, cherishing a passion for science, and gradually making her way in the academic world. She also writes about the plants she loves and studies. And she writes about her relationship with her lab mate Bill, something beyond romance, and coexistent with a happy marriage and a growing family. I was sorry when the book ended. ( )
  annbury | Oct 14, 2019 |
Hope Jahren's story is a joy to read. At first I was totally taken in by this book, both her research and her personal life. . I loved Hope's relationship with Bill, the quirkiness of their love for each other, the humor and sheer joy of their friendship. I loved their escapades and the uniqueness of these two flawed and lovely people. Her writing was wonderful - at times poetic - and I really felt her passion for her work and life. I loved learning so much new information about trees, especially her intimate relationship with them and all that they have to teach. After a while, however, I became less enamored with the science and was ready for the book to end. That may have been my own circumstances rather than issues with the book, as her vibrant story continued to be new and interesting. I may reread the book at another time when my mind is clearer. ( )
  njinthesun | Sep 8, 2019 |
Excellent book! Learned so much about plants, and there was such wonder in knowing more about something so ubiquitous. I'll never see trees the same way again. Also loved Hope and Bill and their exploits, and their furious passion. So delighted I've read it. ( )
  joliek | Sep 7, 2019 |
I usually love scientists' memoirs, but this one didn't work for me. It's a very personal memoir, about her life, her insecurities, her relationship with her research assistant. The problem is that there is next to no science! Having read the whole book, I still have no idea what research she is doing. Lots of carbon dating, apparently, but I don't know why. Jahren gives lots of stories about life as an early researcher, but these are less interesting without the context. Between stories she throws in facts about plants, which are interesting, but I want to learn *how* scientists (and preferably Jahren herself) learned these facts. Is her work boring? Is it abstruse? I wish she had tried to explain it.

> These shallow roots also leak moisture into the dry soil, especially when the sun is down and the tree's leaves are not actively sweating. Mature maple trees passively redistribute water taken from depth up and out of their shallow roots all night long. The small plants living near these big trees have been shown to rely upon this recycled water for more than half of their needs.

> In order to prepare for their long winter journey, trees undergo a process known as "hardening." First the permeability of the cell walls increases drastically, allowing pure water to flow out while concentrating the sugars, proteins, and acids left behind. These chemicals act as a potent antifreeze, such that the cell can now dip well below freezing and the fluid inside of it will still persist in a syrupy liquid form. The spaces between the cells are now filled with an ultra-pure distillate of cell water, so pure that there are no stray atoms upon which an ice crystal could nucleate and grow

> By the end of three summer field seasons, we’d sampled our way through a hundred vertical feet of time and were able to identify at least one strong swing in climate that the forests had been able to tolerate. From this we have argued that these ancient Arctic ecosystems are better characterized as "resilient" than "stable." ( )
  breic | Aug 31, 2019 |
i was hoping this would be more focused on her actual work and research then just her regular life
  ireneattolia | Aug 23, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 88 (next | show all)
With “Lab Girl,” Jahren has taken the form of the memoir and done something remarkable with it. She’s made the experience of reading the book mimic her own lived experience in a way that few writers are capable of.

She swerves from observations about plant life (“A cactus doesn’t live in the desert because it likes the desert; it lives there because the desert hasn’t killed it yet”) to a report from the interior of her tortured brain (“Full-blown mania lets you see the other side of death”) to adventures on the road with Bill (“ ‘Do you really think this is illegal?’ I asked Bill over the CB radio.”) — and somehow, it all works, because the structure and the language follow the story.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hope Jahrenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gumpert, Ignacio VillaroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pérez, María José ViejoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taeger, MerleÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The more I handled things and learned their names and uses, the more joyous and confident grew my sense of kinship with the rest of the world. -Helen Keller
Dedication
Everything that I write is dedicated to my mother.
First words
People love the ocean.
There is nothing in the world more perfect than a slide rule.
Quotations
...silent togetherness is what Scandinavian families do naturally, and it may be what they do best.
In my own small experience, sexism has been something very simple: the cumulative weight of constantly being told that you can't possibly be what you are.
A cactus doesn’t live in the desert because it likes the desert; it lives there because the desert hasn’t killed it yet.
I have learned that raising a child is essentially one long, slow agony of letting go.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world.

Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more.

Lab Girl is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.

Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home.

Jahren’s probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be. [retrieved 9/20/17 from Amazon.com]
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.11)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 10
2.5 3
3 42
3.5 35
4 161
4.5 47
5 117

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,910,929 books! | Top bar: Always visible