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The Literary Galaxy of Star Trek: An…
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The Literary Galaxy of Star Trek: An Analysis of References And Themes in…

by James F. Broderick

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0786425717, Paperback)

How is the android Data like Shakespeare’s character Hamlet? Is the vengeful Khan (original series episode “Space Seed” and the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan) an echo of Captain Ahab in Moby Dick? The links between Star Trek and literature are vast: themes and characters that reflect those in classic literature; characters that quote literature in their dialog; and an enormous body of nonfiction books, novels, articles that have grown from the saga. Finally, like literature, Star Trek seeks to help in the human endeavor of understanding the world and its place in the universe. This book explores all of those connections. The Next Generation’s Captain Picard frequently quotes Shakespeare. Captain Janeway from Voyager reenacts literature in holodeck novels. Jake Sisko, son of Deep Space Nine’s Commander Benjamin Sisko, becomes an award-winning writer. Beginning with Captain James T. Kirk’s first appearance in the original series, then continuing through four subsequent series and ten movies, this book draws parallels between Star Trek stories and literary classics such as Hamlet, Paradise Lost, Ulysses, Dracula, and the New Testament, and works by the likes of Booker T. Washington, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare. Appendices list the literary works discussed and the episodes and movies mentioned, each giving the chapters where references can be found.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:57 -0400)

"Beginning with Captain James T. Kirk's first appearance in the original series, then continuing through four subsequent series and ten movies, this book draws parallels between Star Trek stories and literary classics. Appendices list the literary works discussed and the episodes and movies mentioned, each giving the chapters where references can be found"--Provided by publisher.… (more)

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