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The Emperor's Revenge by Clive Cussler
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The Emperor's Revenge

by Clive Cussler

Other authors: Boyd Morrison

Series: Oregon Files (11)

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» See also 36 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
It doesn't take you long to guess who the "Emperor" is after Cussler's historical prologue which opens all of his books. From there the story enters the present day and you wonder "what did that have to do with what's happening now." That's just what Clive Cussler does well...blends the past with the present and presents a story that you just have to read more and more of.

This one is well written with lots of a variety of action. I especially enjoy the various crew members of the Oregon. Each one has a surprising range of skills and talents. This and the great story lines keeps the series from getting dull. ( )
  Carol420 | Aug 24, 2018 |
It has taken me almost 2 years to finish this book. It just didn’t grab my interest the usual way. The start was rather slow. Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon had their banking accounts hacked to the tune of millions of dollars. Juan set out to find the hackers. To that end he comes across a former Russian Admiral who is intent upon finding Napoleon’s cache of Russian plunder, as well as robbing the world’s banks of billions of Euros. The hunt takes them from the Mediterranean to the Baltic Seas and puts Juan’s ship in serious jeopardy, along with the lives of the Oregon’s crew. It was a marginal read, once I got past the first 150 exceedingly slow pages. Not one of the better Cussler yarns. ( )
  Raspberrymocha | Aug 23, 2018 |
Another winner for Cussler. Add Juan's corporation's money being stolen, a Napoleon letter being found and treasure all makes this another great adventure for the Oregon crew. ( )
  travelgal | Sep 16, 2017 |
I really enjoyed Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt novels, but I can't say that all the other's under his brand name are quite as good. They suffer from certain flaws that tend to repeat in just about every novel.

The heroes are all perfect, the best in the world at everything they do.
They have unlimited resources.
They have the latest, most amazing tech that can solve any problem.
There's no really big problems or setbacks. Especially on a personal level.
There's very little characterization or growth, even in main characters.
Quite obviously, they suffer from James Bond wannabe syndrome, forgetting the fact that James Bond wasn't rich, he only wore nice suits.

I think one of the worst aspects of the Oregon novels is the fact that the 'good guys' operate as a private corporation. Instead of working for the government, for the people, they are paid mercenaries. Doing the job for the right reasons isn't enough, they have to be super rich doing it. And it's sad that this part excites fans. James Bond didn't do it for the glory or the money, he saved the world because it was the right thing to do, duty and honor, as well as a personal challenge. But the Oregon files and books similar, of which there are too many, are teaching people that money should be the objective, or at least part of the equation.

This book actually goes a step further in the wrong direction. A crisis hits the world, with bad guys behind it. The motive of the bad guys? Money. Ok, fine. But the motive of the good guys? The bad guys took our money and we want it back. Literally. They actually say that. Sure, the 'good guys' save the world in the end, from a financial crisis it probably deserves, but what we have here is literally two groups fighting over money. And, the 'good guys' are actually the wealthier ones. it's a case of the rich going out to defeat a bunch of not-rich trying to get super rich. It's as if the rich elite as suddenly super spies and heroes.

I'm absolutely fucking disgusted with this. It's bullshit. It made what could have been a 3 star review only a 1 star review because all this book does is encourage rotten, materialistic values.

We should not be motivated in life by fantastic wealth. This is just wrong. And I don't give a damn if that sells books, we need to be more responsible than that. Encouraging wealth competition and inequality is only making society more conflicted and more unequal and unhappier. Stories should guide us into a better world, not capitalize on selfish wish-fulfillment and greed.

Outside of the gross motivation, the plot itself is formulaic. Nothing but action with very little characterization or drama. I was hoping they would develop a real relationship between the main character and the female potential love interest, but was very disappointed when they (SPOILER) came to nothing in the end. Why? Just so, what, he can remain open to random women in future novels? Boring.

I will say that the book stood out in two ways. First, they killed off a secondary character, a member of their team, which is rarely done. Unfortunately, they spent very little time on how anyone was affected by this.

Second, The Emperor's Revenge actually has a tiny crossover with another novel from another line by Clive Cussler. I remember reading the other novel a while back and it was neat to see the character's from The Emperor's Revenge pop up. But it wasn't until I read this novel that I realized the crossover was planned and appeared in two books. It was well done and a fun surprise.

The action is decent and the death and crossover could have garnered the book 3 stars, but I just can't get past the greed of it all. This book is a champion for capitalism and selfishness, and, as such, sadly, I can't recommend it. ( )
  TimothyBaril | Jul 24, 2017 |
I have read most, if not all, of The Oregon Files, but this is the first one which has been co-authored by Boyd Morrison. I am always a little sceptical about new partnerships, so this came as a pleasant surprise. The story flows, no perhaps that should be torrents, along in true Cussler style, but with an unexpected, yet welcome addition in that Mr Morrison obviously a sense of humour. I did find myself laughing occasionally, and that definitely enhanced the read.
Typical of Cussler there is a historical connection, but The Emperor in the title is not one of those I would have expected. If the title had been “The Little Emperor’s Revenge” then I would have known before the first page which has a very courageous attempt to free Napoleon from his island exile. In the present day some of the Russian Treasure that Napoleon was reputed to have hidden somewhere during his retreat from Moscow holds a very important key to the plans of Sergey Golov who not only wants to gain his revenge on Russia for their damage to his career and his home nation of Ukraine, but in the process make himself the richest man on earth, along with the help of his computer genius daughter.
So Juan Cabrillo and his crew have a fascinating problem to solve, including a yacht, Achilles, that has been equipped in almost superior fashion to his own Oregon and, we discover, in the very same shipyard in Vladivostock. The story races from Monaco to Malta, various parts of the Baltic, and on to the border between Denmark and The Netherlands. It even includes something of a crossover in that Kurt Austin and Joe Zavala make a brief, but very valuable contribution.
Yes, you have to be prepared to have your incredulity stretched, but not so far that it becomes unbelievable. A very worthy addition to the Cussler collection. ( )
  Alan1946 | May 27, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cussler, Cliveprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morrison, Boydsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399175962, Hardcover)

The new Oregon Files adventure from the #1 New York Times–bestselling grand master of adventure.
 
Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon face their toughest challenge yet when a violent bank heist during the Monaco Grand Prix decimates the Corporation’s accounts. To get the money back, Juan joins forces with an old friend from his days in the CIA so they can track down a rogue hacker and a ruthless former Ukrainian naval officer. It is only after the hunt begins that the enormity of the plan comes into focus: the bank theft is just the first step in a plot that will result in the deaths of millions and bring the world’s economies to a standstill. The catalyst for the scheme? A stunning document stolen during Napoleon’s disastrous invasion of Russia. But two hundred years later, it may be the thing that brings Europe to its knees.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 18 Oct 2015 11:33:10 -0400)

Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon face their toughest challenge yet when a violent bank heist during the Monaco Grand Prix decimates the Corporation's accounts. To get the money back, Juan joins forces with an old friend from his days in the CIA so they can track down a rogue hacker and a ruthless former Ukrainian naval officer. It is only after the hunt begins that the enormity of the plan comes into focus: the bank theft is just the first step in a plot that will result in the deaths of millions and bring the world's economies to a standstill. The catalyst for the scheme? A stunning document stolen during Napoleon's disastrous invasion of Russia. But two hundred years later, it may be the thing that brings Europe to its knees.… (more)

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