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Leonardo, the Terrible Monster by Mo Willems
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Leonardo, the Terrible Monster (2005)

by Mo Willems

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8359410,789 (4.33)18
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    Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson (beelrami)
    beelrami: Both stories about monsters that might not be very good monsters.
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Showing 1-5 of 93 (next | show all)
Leonardo is a terrible monster! He cannot scare anybody, try as he might.He isn't huge or have monstrous teeth. He starts looking for a scaredy cat kid and finds Sam.Leonardo tries to scare Sam in every which way, until Sam cries and Leonardo realizes that maybe he doesn't want to be frightening, after all.
  aartik | Jun 26, 2015 |
I loved this book for a couple of reasons. I liked how the author added certain aspects to the story that aren't typically used. For example, the author used an asterisk when the narrator said, "He didn't have 1,642* teeth like Tony". At the bottom of the page the author added, "*Note: Not all teeth shown", to assure the reader that the illustrations given do now show all 1,642 teeth. Since this wasn't an informational text, I wouldn't imagine an author using this symbol. It added humor to the story, in an extremely creative way. I also liked the author/illustrator's use of empty space in the book. For example, when Leonardo was researching to find the most frightful kid to scare, he discovered Sam. Turning on to the next page, you can see two large blank pages with a small illustration of sad Sam sitting on the bottom, left corner of the page. This emphasized Sam's sense of loneliness through the empty pages rather than words. Along with this attribute, the author fills in the empty space, on another page, to emphasize Sam's emotions yet again. For example, once Leonardo scares him, Sam begins to cry which makes Leonardo happy because he believes he is the reason Sam is crying. Sam explains, using two entire pages with bold and colored print to express his anger. This shows the authors ability to fill up the entire page with words, rather than illustrations, which is rare for a picture book. The main idea of this book is to accept who you are and not to judge others before getting to know them. ( )
  CatalinaDiaz | May 2, 2015 |
This book would be good to use for reading with expression. I think students will like this book because they will feel bad for the monster. ( )
  Kate_Schulte078 | Apr 29, 2015 |
This book seems like it would be great for a read aloud and a lesson on expression in first or second grade. Leonardo discovers that he does not have to be scary to make friends, so using the story's outcome, teachers could make a lesson about being yourself for students in preschool or kindergarten. This book is appropriate for preschool to second grade.
  Sarah.Lew | Apr 29, 2015 |
Leonardo was a terrible monster, but in the typical terrible way. Leonardo couldn't scare anyone. He tried and tried to scare, but he just couldn't. He decided to find the kid who was the best possible chance of scaring. After doing his research, Leonardo found Sam. Leonardo tried as hard as he could to scare Sam, and Sam began to cry. Leonardo was so excited that he finally scared someone, but Same revealed he was crying because he had a terrible day. Leonardo was disappointed but decided to comfort Sam instead. Sam and Leonardo became friends, who occasionally scared each other. Just because you are supposed to be good at something, doesn't mean you have to be. Monster's are supposed to be scary, and because Leonardo wasn't, he decided to move on. He quit wasting his time trying to be something he wasn't and focused on what was more important to him, being a good friend. ( )
  EmilyDrennan | Apr 26, 2015 |
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FOR THE TRIXTER, MY OWN LITTLE MONSTER
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0786852941, Hardcover)

Leonardo is truly a terrible monster-terrible at being a monster that is. No matter how hard he tries, he can't seem to frighten anyone. Determined to succeed, Leonardo sets himself to training and research. Finally, he finds a nervous little boy, and scares the tuna salad out of him! But scaring people isn't quite as satisfying as he thought it would be. Leonardo realizes that he might be a terrible, awful monster-but he could be a really good friend.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:31 -0400)

Leonardo is a terrible monster -- he can't seem to frighten anyone. When he discovers the perfect nervous little boy, will he scare the lunch out of him? Or will he think of something better?

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