HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Secret of the Stones by Ernest Dempsey
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6315266,876 (3.67)15

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 15 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Hmmm. 15% of the way in and I'm beginning to wish I hadn't bought the whole trilogy. At least the mysterious treasure is original and not the usual secret of the templars/key to the lost library of Alexandria/lost gospel of Jesus (delete as applicable) guff.

Not really what I would have thought an archaeological thriller would be I have to say. ( )
  Only2rs | Feb 4, 2018 |
Secret of the Stones by Ernest Dempsey
4.5 stars

From The Book:
Sean Wyatt's learns his best friend has been kidnapped while working on a secret project. Sean and his new acquaintance, Allyson Webster, embark on a mission to solve a series of ancient clues they he hopes will lead to whoever kidnapped his friend. The riddles lead them on a dangerous chase through the southeastern United States and to a four thousand year-old secret that is bigger than anything they could have ever imagined.

My Thoughts:
I liked this book so much more than I ever thought possible. It's filled from cover to cover with action, suspense, a murder and a history lesson....so what's not to like? Fiction and legend are mixed to develop a theory on the origins of Native Americans on the North American continent. The reader doesn't have to agree with the theory to be entertained by the content and the process that provided the theory. Betrayal sets the stage for the next book and I believe I will be on a search for it. ( )
  Carol420 | Mar 11, 2017 |
In "The Secret of the Stones" Ernest Dempsey introduces his action hero, Sean Wyatt. Wyatt is a mixture of Indiana Jones and James Bond. Dempsey gives some background for Sean and we find out that he is an archeologist and was a former government agent in a clandestine organization known as Axis. The novel reminds me somewhat of Clive Cussler, where the story begins in the past and then is tied in to the present. Cussler's hero, Dirk Pitt, collects classic cars while Wyatt collects motorcycles.

The story begins with Tommy Schultz giving Frank Borringer, a professor at Kennisaw State University, a stone disc with writings on one side. The message was written in four separate dead languages and Borringer was one of the few people who could decipher it. Once done, Frank puts the message in an envelope and drops it in the mail. This was done just in time as Borringer was murdered by a German who was after the translation.

Tommy Schultz, a childhood friend of Sean Wyatt, was willed millions of dollars by his parents and used the money to found the IAA, or International Archaeological Agency. Schultz is kidnapped by the German in order for him to help find the four chambers of gold that legend attributed to the Cherokee Indians. Meanwhile, Sean was finishing up an interview with Allyson Webster, a journalist for the Atlanta Sentinel, when a group of mercenaries tried to kill him. The instincts and training he received from Axis kicked in and Sean was able to put down his attackers and flee the scene with Allyson in tow.

Detective Trent Morris and his partner Will Hastings were assigned to head up the murder investigation. Morris had reason to believe that Wyatt was involved and was implicated in the murder of Frank Borringer and the kidnapping of Tommy Schultz. Sean and Allyson were on the run with their main goal of finding his friend Tommy. Sean enlists the help of his friend Joe McElroy, who was an expert in Native American cultures. Tommy, forced to help the German, and Sean were in a race to see who would be the first to find the chambers. One clue led to another as they went to state parks all over Georgia to decipher the riddle of the stones.

Dempsey mixes fact with fiction and legend as he develops a theory on the origins of Native Americans on the North American continent.. The book is filled with action and suspense and we get a history lesson in the process. The book was hard to put down and I finished it in rather a short time. A betrayal by one of the characters caught me off guard and set the stage for the next novel. While I do not agree with Dempsey's theory, it did provide some food for thought. The only negative I found was a poor job of editing, but I am willing to overlook that. If you are a fan of the Da Vinci code, then you will enjoy this book as I did. I look forward to the further adventures of Sean Wyatt. ( )
  NPJacobsen | Jan 28, 2016 |
In "The Secret of the Stones" Ernest Dempsey introduces his action hero, Sean Wyatt. Wyatt is a mixture of Indiana Jones and James Bond. Dempsey gives some background for Sean and we find out that he is an archeologist and was a former government agent in a clandestine organization known as Axis. The novel reminds me somewhat of Clive Cussler, where the story begins in the past and then is tied in to the present. Cussler's hero, Dirk Pitt, collects classic cars while Wyatt collects motorcycles.

The story begins with Tommy Schultz giving Frank Borringer, a professor at Kennisaw State University, a stone disc with writings on one side. The message was written in four separate dead languages and Borringer was one of the few people who could decipher it. Once done, Frank puts the message in an envelope and drops it in the mail. This was done just in time as Borringer was murdered by a German who was after the translation.

Tommy Schultz, a childhood friend of Sean Wyatt, was willed millions of dollars by his parents and used the money to found the IAA, or International Archaeological Agency. Schultz is kidnapped by the German in order for him to help find the four chambers of gold that legend attributed to the Cherokee Indians. Meanwhile, Sean was finishing up an interview with Allyson Webster, a journalist for the Atlanta Sentinel, when a group of mercenaries tried to kill him. The instincts and training he received from Axis kicked in and Sean was able to put down his attackers and flee the scene with Allyson in tow.

Detective Trent Morris and his partner Will Hastings were assigned to head up the murder investigation. Morris had reason to believe that Wyatt was involved and was implicated in the murder of Frank Borringer and the kidnapping of Tommy Schultz. Sean and Allyson were on the run with their main goal of finding his friend Tommy. Sean enlists the help of his friend Joe McElroy, who was an expert in Native American cultures. Tommy, forced to help the German, and Sean were in a race to see who would be the first to find the chambers. One clue led to another as they went to state parks all over Georgia to decipher the riddle of the stones.

Dempsey mixes fact with fiction and legend as he develops a theory on the origins of Native Americans on the North American continent.. The book is filled with action and suspense and we get a history lesson in the process. The book was hard to put down and I finished it in rather a short time. A betrayal by one of the characters caught me off guard and set the stage for the next novel. While I do not agree with Dempsey's theory, it did provide some food for thought. The only negative I found was a poor job of editing, but I am willing to overlook that. If you are a fan of the Da Vinci code, then you will enjoy this book as I did. I look forward to the further adventures of Sean Wyatt. ( )
  NPJacobsen | Jan 28, 2016 |
In "The Secret of the Stones" Ernest Dempsey introduces his action hero, Sean Wyatt. Wyatt is a mixture of Indiana Jones and James Bond. Dempsey gives some background for Sean and we find out that he is an archeologist and was a former government agent in a clandestine organization known as Axis. The novel reminds me somewhat of Clive Cussler, where the story begins in the past and then is tied in to the present. Cussler's hero, Dirk Pitt, collects classic cars while Wyatt collects motorcycles.

The story begins with Tommy Schultz giving Frank Borringer, a professor at Kennisaw State University, a stone disc with writings on one side. The message was written in four separate dead languages and Borringer was one of the few people who could decipher it. Once done, Frank puts the message in an envelope and drops it in the mail. This was done just in time as Borringer was murdered by a German who was after the translation.

Tommy Schultz, a childhood friend of Sean Wyatt, was willed millions of dollars by his parents and used the money to found the IAA, or International Archaeological Agency. Schultz is kidnapped by the German in order for him to help find the four chambers of gold that legend attributed to the Cherokee Indians. Meanwhile, Sean was finishing up an interview with Allyson Webster, a journalist for the Atlanta Sentinel, when a group of mercenaries tried to kill him. The instincts and training he received from Axis kicked in and Sean was able to put down his attackers and flee the scene with Allyson in tow.

Detective Trent Morris and his partner Will Hastings were assigned to head up the murder investigation. Morris had reason to believe that Wyatt was involved and was implicated in the murder of Frank Borringer and the kidnapping of Tommy Schultz. Sean and Allyson were on the run with their main goal of finding his friend Tommy. Sean enlists the help of his friend Joe McElroy, who was an expert in Native American cultures. Tommy, forced to help the German, and Sean were in a race to see who would be the first to find the chambers. One clue led to another as they went to state parks all over Georgia to decipher the riddle of the stones.

Dempsey mixes fact with fiction and legend as he develops a theory on the origins of Native Americans on the North American continent.. The book is filled with action and suspense and we get a history lesson in the process. The book was hard to put down and I finished it in rather a short time. A betrayal by one of the characters caught me off guard and set the stage for the next novel. While I do not agree with Dempsey's theory, it did provide some food for thought. The only negative I found was a poor job of editing, but I am willing to overlook that. If you are a fan of the Da Vinci code, then you will enjoy this book as I did. I look forward to the further adventures of Sean Wyatt. ( )
  NPJacobsen | Jan 28, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 2
3 2
3.5 1
4 1
4.5 1
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,829,228 books! | Top bar: Always visible