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Drawing Blood by Molly Crabapple
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Drawing Blood (edition 2015)

by Molly Crabapple (Author)

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952211,734 (4.31)2
Art was my dearest friend. To draw was trouble and safety, adventure and freedom. In that four-cornered kingdom of paper, I lived as I pleased. This is the story of a girl and her sketchbook. In language that is fresh, visceral, and deeply moving—and illustrations that are irreverent and gorgeous—here is a memoir that will change the way you think about art, sex, politics, and survival in our times. From a young age, Molly Crabapple had the eye of an artist and the spirit of a radical. After a restless childhood on New York's Long Island, she left America to see Europe and the Near East, a young artist plunging into unfamiliar cultures, notebook always in hand, drawing what she observed. Returning to New York City after 9/11 to study art, she posed nude for sketch artists and sketchy photographers, danced burlesque, and modeled for the world famous Suicide Girls. Frustrated with the academy and the conventional art world, she eventually landed a post as house artist at Simon Hammerstein's legendary nightclub The Box, the epicenter of decadent Manhattan nightlife before the financial crisis of 2008. There she had a ringside seat for the pitched battle between the bankers of Wall Street and the entertainers who walked among them—a scandalous, drug-fueled circus of mutual exploitation that she captured in her tart and knowing illustrations. Then, after the crash, a wave of protest movements—from student demonstrations in London to Occupy Wall Street in her own backyard—led Molly to turn her talents to a new form of witness journalism, reporting from places such as Guantanamo, Syria, Rikers Island, and the labor camps of Abu Dhabi. Using both words and artwork to shed light on the darker corners of American empire, she has swiftly become one of the most original and galvanizing voices on the cultural stage. Now, with the same blend of honesty, fierce insight, and indelible imagery that is her signature, Molly offers her own story: an unforgettable memoir of artistic exploration, political awakening, and personal transformation.… (more)
Member:jtietze
Title:Drawing Blood
Authors:Molly Crabapple (Author)
Info:Harper (2015), 352 pages
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Drawing Blood by Molly Crabapple

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I had only heard of Crabapple's book through "The Great Discontent." I had never heard of her previously, but when I saw her memoir at the library, I immediately checked it out. She really lets herself have it. She is brutally honest about herself and it made me really want to get to know more about her. She also includes a lot of her art work in the book (with full color). (I hadn't been reading for pleasure very long, her artwork made the chapters seem shorter - which helped my mind out.) After reading this, I became a huge fan. If I'd already known about her, this book would have just made me have more respect for her and her work in general. I would definitely recommend this to anyone. ( )
  MadelynJackson | Jun 6, 2017 |
I was reading this in ARC form and then put on hold until I could have the finished copy with the color illustrations—that really made so much of a difference, and I'm glad I did. It was a lot of fun, and it puts to rest the idea that someone so young couldn't possibly have a memoir in them—Crabapple's artistic journey, and her process of radicalization, are really interesting and she writes them out well. It's good to follow someone else's journey when they actually go places, either physically or interiorly—it becomes a travelogue in the best sense of the word. Plus the art is great to see, and has been used really nicely within the text. Good job, and I'm looking forward to the next installment in another 20 years or so. ( )
1 vote lisapeet | Dec 13, 2015 |
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Art was my dearest friend. To draw was trouble and safety, adventure and freedom. In that four-cornered kingdom of paper, I lived as I pleased. This is the story of a girl and her sketchbook. In language that is fresh, visceral, and deeply moving—and illustrations that are irreverent and gorgeous—here is a memoir that will change the way you think about art, sex, politics, and survival in our times. From a young age, Molly Crabapple had the eye of an artist and the spirit of a radical. After a restless childhood on New York's Long Island, she left America to see Europe and the Near East, a young artist plunging into unfamiliar cultures, notebook always in hand, drawing what she observed. Returning to New York City after 9/11 to study art, she posed nude for sketch artists and sketchy photographers, danced burlesque, and modeled for the world famous Suicide Girls. Frustrated with the academy and the conventional art world, she eventually landed a post as house artist at Simon Hammerstein's legendary nightclub The Box, the epicenter of decadent Manhattan nightlife before the financial crisis of 2008. There she had a ringside seat for the pitched battle between the bankers of Wall Street and the entertainers who walked among them—a scandalous, drug-fueled circus of mutual exploitation that she captured in her tart and knowing illustrations. Then, after the crash, a wave of protest movements—from student demonstrations in London to Occupy Wall Street in her own backyard—led Molly to turn her talents to a new form of witness journalism, reporting from places such as Guantanamo, Syria, Rikers Island, and the labor camps of Abu Dhabi. Using both words and artwork to shed light on the darker corners of American empire, she has swiftly become one of the most original and galvanizing voices on the cultural stage. Now, with the same blend of honesty, fierce insight, and indelible imagery that is her signature, Molly offers her own story: an unforgettable memoir of artistic exploration, political awakening, and personal transformation.

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