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Sweet Home Alaska by Carole Estby Dagg
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Sweet Home Alaska

by Carole Estby Dagg

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This exciting pioneering story, based on actual events, introduces readers to a fascinating chapter in American history, when FDR set up a New Deal colony in Alaska to give loans and land to families struggling during the Great Depression.

Terpsichore can’t wait to follow in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s footsteps . . . now she just has to convince her mom. It’s 1934, and times are tough for their family. To make a fresh start, Terpsichore’s father signs up for President Roosevelt’s Palmer Colony project, uprooting them from Wisconsin to become pioneers in Alaska. Their new home is a bit of a shock—it’s a town still under construction in the middle of the wilderness, where the residents live in tents and share a community outhouse. But Terpsichore’s not about to let first impressions get in the way of this grand adventure. Tackling its many unique challenges with her can-do attitude, she starts making things happen to make Alaska seem more like home. Soon, she and her family are able to start settling in and enjoying their new surroundings—everyone except her mother, that is. So, in order to stay, Terpsichore hatches a plan to convince her that it’s a wonderful—and civilized—place to live . . . a plan that’s going to take all the love, energy, and Farmer Boy expertise Terpsichore can muster.
  Clippers | Dec 21, 2017 |
Grades 2 and up. A pleasant, low-conflict story. Would be interesting as a read aloud, to examine how Terpsichore and her family went "back in time" in a way, leaving 1930s comforts such as music players, ovens, electricity, running water, large schools and libraries. It may be enlightening to students to know that there were "pioneers" at many different points in history. Would be particularly relevant to study of Alaska history. Includes an Author's Note.
  afshaffer | Jul 16, 2017 |
I reviewed the audio version of Sweet Home Alaska. It's historical fiction set during the Great Depression with particular interest to librarians. Though the main storyline is a family's struggles to homestead in Alaska, there is a library-related subplot.
In an attempt to create a fledgling library for an impoverished population with scare resources, the protagonist (and later, the entire settlement), struggles with collection development and circulation issues. What should the library acquire and why? How will it be funded? Who will have access and how? Sound familiar? Of course, author Carole Estby Dagg is - you guessed it - a librarian!

My review of Sweet Home Alaska for AudioFile Magazine is here:
http://www.audiofilemagazine.com/reviews/read/108561/sweet-home-alaska-by-carole... ( )
  shelf-employed | Jul 17, 2016 |
Narrated by Susan Denaker. Terpsichore and her family move to Alaska from Wisconsin during the Great Depression to get a new start along with other Midwestern families participating in President FDR's colony plan. There is no inclusion of the Native population in Alaska by the author's choice who in her research found no mention by the families about interacting with Alaskan natives. Denaker's performance is superb and the pacing easy. Everyone is distinctly voiced and personalized and she uses a Midwestern accent during spoken dialog, (I noticed those nasal, rounded vowels immediately!) A warm and family-friendly audio experience. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
This was a fun middle school book (that I also enjoyed) about a young girl named Terpsichore and her family in the 1930s. President FDR has set up a New Deal colony in Alaska which gives loans and land to struggling families. Terpsichore's family is one of the first groups who leave there home and set up to begin a new life in Alaska.

Once I got used to the main characters name (and yes, the author does let us know it is unusual and that she was named for a artistic muse) the story flows along at a quick pace. It was so interesting and fun to read about the families move and pioneering spirit which was largely due to Terpsichore's great personality. I received a complimentary copy via Netgalley.com ( )
  melaniehope | Jan 28, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399172033, Hardcover)

This exciting pioneering story, based on actual events, introduces readers to a fascinating chapter in American history, when FDR set up a New Deal colony in Alaska to give loans and land to families struggling during the Great Depression.
 
Trip can’t wait to follow in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s footsteps . . . now she just has to convince her mom. It’s 1934, and times are tough for their family. To make a fresh start, Trip’s father signs up for President Roosevelt’s Palmer Colony project, uprooting them from Wisconsin to become pioneers in Alaska. Their new home is a bit of a shock—it’s a town still under construction in the middle of the wilderness, where the residents live in tents and share a community outhouse. But Trip’s not about to let first impressions get in the way of this grand adventure. Tackling its many unique challenges with her can-do attitude, she starts making things happen to make Alaska seem more like home. Soon, she and her family are able to start settling in and enjoying their new surroundings—everyone except her mother, that is. So, in order to stay, Trip hatches a plan to convince her that it’s a wonderful—and civilized—place to live . . . a plan that’s going to take all the love, energy, and Farmer Boy expertise Trip can muster.

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 18 Dec 2015 02:54:29 -0500)

In 1934, eleven-year-old Terpsichore's father signs up for President Roosevelt's Palmer Colony project, uprooting the family from Wisconsin to become pioneers in Alaska, where Terpsichore refuses to let rough conditions and first impressions get in the way of her grand adventure.… (more)

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