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Using PDA in Libraries: Using Personal…
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Using PDA in Libraries: Using Personal Digital Assistants in Libraries…

by Colleen Cuddy

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The Call Number in our library is Z674.7 C83 2005.
  lbpks | Jun 20, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 155570543X, Paperback)

Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs)—portable, multifunctional, and able to connect with computers and networks—are both a fast-selling consumer device and a hot technology for libraries. This timely guide helps librarians and information professionals understand how these devices fit into day-to-day operations and how libraries can become more accommodating to PDA-using patrons. Cuddy provides an overview of PDAs, including their history, a comparison of different makes and models, and a look ahead at their future growth. She explores the wireless benefits, storage options, and valuable peripherals (cameras, barcode readers, cardswipes, printers) for PDAs. Software applications—Microsoft Word, document readers, Web browsing, and more—are examined and discussed. The use of PDAs in collection development and provision of materials—e-journals, e-books, databases—is outlined. Special sections cover the applicability of this technology to special projects including delivering content to users, developing applications, lending policies (both for PDAs and PDA-readable content), mobilizing staff, marketing and promoting services, developing instruction, privacy and security, and more. Practical and easy-to-understand, this manual demystifies PDAs and prepares professionals to harness their portable power.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:31 -0400)

Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs)--portable, multifunctional, and able to connect with computers and networks--are both a fast-selling consumer device and a hot technology for libraries. This timely guide helps librarians and information professionals understand how these devices fit into day-to-day operations and how libraries can become more accommodating to PDA-using patrons. Cuddy provides an overview of PDAs, including their history, a comparison of different makes and models, and a look ahead at their future growth. She explores the wireless benefits, storage options, and valuable peripherals (cameras, barcode readers, cardswipes, printers) for PDAs. Software applications--Microsoft Word, document readers, Web browsing, and more--are examined and discussed. The use of PDAs in collection development and provision of materials--e-journals, e-books, databases--is outlined. Special sections cover the applicability of this technology to special projects including delivering content to users, developing applications, lending policies (both for PDAs and PDA-readable content), mobilizing staff, marketing and promoting services, developing instruction, privacy and security, and more. Practical and easy-to-understand, this manual demystifies PDAs and prepares professionals to harness their portable power. -- Publisher description.… (more)

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