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I Am No One: A Novel by Patrick Flanery
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I Am No One: A Novel (original 2016; edition 2016)

by Patrick Flanery (Author)

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27412858,789 (2.99)51
Member:Berly
Title:I Am No One: A Novel
Authors:Patrick Flanery (Author)
Info:Tim Duggan Books (2016), 352 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:**1/2
Tags:LTER, 2017, Fiction, NY, Oxford, Teaching, Insanity, Privacy

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I Am No One by Patrick Flanery (2016)

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Showing 1-5 of 134 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Dense but very well done. The novel provided food for thought about surveillance in the United States. The book was driven by character development rather than by plot, and that is fine with me. The density of the writing makes sense considering that it is "written" by the main character who is an academic. Academics are the champs of convoluted writing. I thought that the at times convoluted writing in the novel was a nice touch to stay true to that detail. ( )
1 vote ReadHanded | Feb 7, 2018 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I don't like when books don't give a clear conclusion to a story unless it is part of a series or trilogy and then still I feel somethings get wrapped up. This one felt slow paced, it left way too many questions and for the subject of surveillance, I thought there would be more suspense. I had no sympathy for Jeremy O'Keefe who was a pompous ass who has an affair with his student even though he knows it is wrong. Sorry but even though he said she initiated it, that is wrong, he did and he knew better. This was just okay. The think I liked the most about it was the cover art.

I received this through LibraryThing. ( )
  MHanover10 | Feb 4, 2018 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Honestly... I couldn't get into it. The writing was pretentious and I had no interest in going further than the first couple chapters. I've read enough bad books in my life. ( )
  fields.steph | Oct 8, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Jeremy O'Keefe is a professor, recently returned to NY after teaching abroad at Oxford for over a decade. Shortly after his arrival, he begins to feel like he is being followed and mysterious packages start to arrive. Is he crazy or is he being followed?

Spoiler!! It turns out, Jeremy is under heavy surveillance. The "why" of it doesn't even enter until 2/3 of the way through the book. Still it makes one wonder just how much of our "private" information is up for public viewing, or at least viewing by the powers that be. A valid question, but one that I didn't really want to explore via this book: it took way too long to meander there and it didn't help that I never liked the main character. Not a favorite. ( )
  Berly | Oct 2, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Okay I made the bad mistake of reading some reviews on this book so I kept putting of reading. Most of the reviews are not that good but i really liked this book. I looked forward to hearing the story unfold in the life of the professor and the intrusion into his life. Things that happen in his life make him wonder is this really happening or am I going crazy? It makes you realize how little privacy you have in everyday life with all the electronic gadgets, gps tracking and internet. Who's watching you right now? ( )
  Lainie911 | Jul 24, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 134 (next | show all)
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For AEV & GLF
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At the time of my return to New York earlier this year I had been living in Oxford for more than a decade.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
After a decade of living in England, Jeremy O'Keefe returns to New York, where he has been hired as a professor of German history at New York University. Though comfortable in his new life, and happy to be near his daughter once again, Jeremy continues to feel the quiet pangs of loneliness. Walking through the city at night, fe feels as though he could disappear and no one would even notice.

But soon, Jeremy's life begins taking strange turns; boxes containing records of his online activity are delivered to his apartment, a young man seems to be following him, and his elderly mother receives anonymous phone calls slandering her son. Why, he wonders, would anyone want to watch him so closely, and even more upsetting, why would they alert him to the fact that he was being watched?

As Jeremy takes stock of the entanglements that marked his years abroad, he wonders if he has unwittingly committed a crime so serious that he might soon be faced with his own denaturalization. Moving toward a shattering reassessment of what it means to be free in a time of ever more intrusive surveillance, Jeremy is forced to ask himself whether he is "no one", as he believes, or a traitor not just to his country, but to everyone around him.
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"A mesmerizing novel about memory, privacy, fear, and what happens when our past catches up with us. After a decade living in England, Jeremy O'Keefe returns to New York, where he has been hired as a professor of German history at New York University. Though comfortable in his new life, and happy to be near his daughter once again, Jeremy continues to feel the quiet pangs of loneliness. Walking through the city at night, it's as though he could disappear and no one would even notice. But soon, Jeremy's life begins taking strange turns: boxes containing records of his online activity are delivered to his apartment, a young man seems to be following him, and his elderly mother receives anonymous phone calls slandering her son. Why, he wonders, would anyone want to watch him so closely, and, even more upsetting, why would they alert him to the fact that he was being watched? As Jeremy takes stock of the entanglements that marked his years abroad, he wonders if he has unwittingly committed a crime so serious that he might soon be faced with his own denaturalization. Moving towards a shattering reassessment of what it means to be free in a time of ever more intrusive surveillance, Jeremy is forced to ask himself whether he is 'no one', as he believes, or a traitor not just to his country but to everyone around him"--… (more)

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