HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

This Is The Night: Suffering, Salvation, And…
Loading...

This Is The Night: Suffering, Salvation, And The Liturgies Of Holy Week

by James W. Farwell

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
20None537,190 (3)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0567027600, Paperback)

This Is the Night is a work of "liturgical theology," understood as a theology inspired or informed by the liturgies of Christian Holy Week. In the context of modernity in crisis, it is an attempt to think with the principal liturgies of the "PaschalTriduum" - Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Great Vigil of Easter - about human suffering.

The author works from an analysis of the structure of the Christian paschal liturgies to offer an account of suffering that is more compassionate and honest than that of western modernity. Moreover, this account is the theoretical correlate of an ethic performed by the paschal liturgies: their structure and rhythm give rise not only to an account of suffering and its remedy, but to a compassionate practice into which Christians are called.

In both the philosophical and the popular imagination, modernity is a context in which "progress" is the defining human telos. Because of this commitment to progress, modernity is often allergic to the concrete pain and horror of suffering. Modernity sidelines suffering as an unfortunate but necessary moment in the course of human progress, not infrequently because it is a byproduct of our "progress" - our technical mastery of nature and leadership of global capitalization. In this context, suffering is more a concept than an existential fact or experience. Yet downplaying human suffering in this way creates even greater suffering, by anesthetizing us to its effect on human beings.

Some of the critics of modernity also criticize Christianity as a religious version of the modern myth of
progress, or even as its very source. Inspired in part by the political theology of Johann Metz and by the
liturgical scholarship of Don Saliers, Robert Taft, and others, the author argues instead that in the liturgies
of Holy Week, the passion, death, and resurrection of Christ form a context in which Christians recognize
human suffering not as an unfortunate moment on the way to salvation but as the very field of God's saving
activity. That divine activity is saving precisely as we enter into it by practice. To be saved - to enter into
an abundant and vigorous human life - is to become a priestly people, orienting ourselves toward suffering
in the same way that Jesus Christ did, facing it with courage where necessary and resisting its ravages
where possible.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:37 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,486,211 books! | Top bar: Always visible