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The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A…
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The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A Jew-- Three Women Search for…

by Ranya Idliby, Suzanne Oliver, Priscilla Warner

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A groundbreaking book about Americans searching for faith and mutual respect, The Faith Club weaves the story of three women, their three religions, and their urgent quest to understand one another.

When an American Muslim woman befriends two other mothers, one Jewish and one Christian, they decide to educate their children about their respective religions. None of them guessed their regular meetings would provide life-changing answers and form bonds that would forever alter their struggles with prejudice, fear, and anger. Personal, powerful, and compelling, The Faith Club forces readers to face the tough questions about their own religions.

Pioneering, timely, deeply thoughtful, and full of hope, The Faith Club’s caring message will resonate with people of all faiths.
  St-Johns-Episcopal | Jul 16, 2017 |
This nonfiction work is a compilation of three women who take a journey in their faiths as they gain understanding through the sharing of their beliefs and lives. ( )
  niquetteb | Jan 21, 2016 |
A dear friend loaned me her copy of The Faith Club, as I was reading The Red Tent for my book club, and pondering over how Islam, Christianity, and Judaism all came from similar historical roots and might fit together in harmony. In this nonfiction book, three women, a Muslim, a Christian, and a Jew, meet over a series of years to chronicle some of their thoughts and discussions regarding their beliefs in their religions and their ideas about faith. What seems to have resulted as an outcome of their frank conversations, is an understanding and harmonious respect for the diversity and similarities of each religion. Having such interfaith conversations helped the three women to realize, that although they might worship God in different ways, through their own cultural and religious practices, they could participate in some of the ritualistic events and appreciate the other women’s faith in God. I especially loved the poem which Priscilla, the Jewish woman, heard at a funeral she attended, and it totally addressed the way that I feel wanting to pass on a spirit of love, long after I am gone. The poem reads:

Epitaph
By Merritt Malloy

When I die
Give what’s left of me away
To children
And old men that want to die.
And if you need to cry,
Cry for your brother
Walking the street beside you.
And when you need me,
Put your arms
Around anyone
And give them
What you need to give to me.

I want to leave you something,
Something better
Than words
Or sounds.

Look for me
In the people I’ve known
Or loved,
And if you cannot give me away,
At least let me live on in your eyes
And not on your mind.

You can love me most
By letting
Hands touch hands,
By letting
Bodies touch bodies
And by letting go
Of children
That need to be free.

Love doesn’t die,
People do.
So, when all that’s left of me
Is love,
Give me away.

I was so fortunate to have been invited to participate in Ramadan dinners recently, and I have come to respect Muslim teachings about love, kindness, and respect toward others, as well as Islamic discipline and fortitude in fasting (meaning no eating and drinking of fluids until after dusk for the whole month of Ramadan). God’s outpouring of love for others is truly manifested in a pluralistic attitude, embracing diversity in religions and realizing that we are all God’s children. The three women of The Faith Club sought to promote such an open-minded approach through their insightful discussions about their faith, and the last chapter of the book even provides detailed advice of how to start a faith club. ( )
  haymaai | Jul 9, 2015 |
The authors make an attempt at promoting the idea of interfaith sharing groups and they succeed, but only because they are all on the very moderate (and modern) end of the spectrum in their respective religions. Even then, some of the discussions become a little heated. If they'd included an atheist or a fundamentalist, the conversations would have been a lot more interesting. Still, the concept and purpose is admirable - most religions espouse a similar moral code even though their practices and ceremonies and doctrine are different. Seems like faithful people should be able to find more commonalities than differences. If we're all trying to live by the golden rule, does it really matter where we attend services on a day of worship? ( )
  bookappeal | Mar 16, 2014 |
Memoir of three mothers -- a Jew, a Muslim and a Christian -- who meet over several years with the aim of writing a children's book capturing beloved stories of their respective faiths. In the meeting, they find much much more. They address their misconceptions and learn more about other faiths. In the process they deepen their understanding of what it means to be a person of faith in modern America. Ultimately, they discover what unites them as their friendship and intimacy grows.

It seems I am never more American than when I travel internationally. It is the process of explaining and comparing our culture, politics and way of life that forces us to to intentionally examine things which are often assumed automatically. So, too, with our three memoirists. The very process of describing their faith caused each to look more carefully at reflexive and inherited beliefs.

The three women have been castigated for not properly reflecting the received orthodoxy of the three Abrahamic faiths. They did not hold themselves out to be religious experts, nor did I expect them to be. Ecumenicism is not for everyone. There are those for whom religion is a set series of rules and law clearly separating "us" from "them". There is one true faith and the rest be damned. This book would not be for them. Our three authors are of more moderate stuff. To them, each faith embraces the radical gospel of love and care for God and God's creation in its many glorious forms.

This was the selected reading for my Church's book club. We did not find the prose particularly exciting, but certainly engaging and thought provoking. We were taken with each woman's openess and willingness to honestly and respectfully engage and accept. ( )
  michigantrumpet | Feb 27, 2014 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ranya Idlibyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Oliver, Suzannemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Warner, Priscillamain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743290488, Paperback)

A groundbreaking book about Americans searching for faith and mutual respect, The Faith Club weaves the story of three women, their three religions, and their urgent quest to understand one another.

When an American Muslim woman befriends two other mothers, one Jewish and one Christian, they decide to educate their children about their respective religions. None of them guessed their regular meetings would provide life-changing answers and form bonds that would forever alter their struggles with prejudice, fear, and anger. Personal, powerful, and compelling, The Faith Club forces readers to face the tough questions about their own religions.

Pioneering, timely, deeply thoughtful, and full of hope, The Faith Club’s caring message will resonate with people of all faiths.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:33 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Traces how three American women of different faiths worked together to understand one another while identifying the connections between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, during which they openly discussed the issues that divided them.

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