HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith by…
Loading...

Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith (original 1998; edition 1999)

by Kathleen Norris (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,601137,858 (4.13)28
"Struggling with her return to the Christian church after many years away, Kathleen Norris found it was the language of Christianity that most distanced her from faith. Words like "judgment", "faith", "dogma", "salvation", "sinner" -- even "Christ" -- formed what she called her "scary vocabulary", words that had become so codified or abstract that their meanings were all but impenetrable. She found she had to wrestle with them and make them her own before they could confer their blessings and their grace. Blending history, theology, story-telling, etymology, and memoir, Norris uses these words as a starting point for reflection, and offers a moving account of her own gradual conversion. She evokes a rich spirituality rooted firmly in the chaos of everyday life -- and offers believers and doubters alike an illuminating perspective on how we can embrace ancient traditions and find faith in the contemporary world." -- from back cover.… (more)
Member:Grobiewan
Title:Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith
Authors:Kathleen Norris (Author)
Info:Riverhead Books (1999), Edition: Revised ed., 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith by Kathleen Norris (1998)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 28 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
A wonderful slow muse on religious language as it relates to experience. My favorite ones: Chosen, Pentecostal, Asceticism and Infallibility. Oh, and the one on Prayer was so good I went to the trouble of xeroxing it for a friend. It was bed time reading for over a year, one paragraph at a time. Perfect for tilting the close of the day to peace. ( )
  MaryHeleneMele | May 6, 2019 |
From the New York Times-bestselling author of The Cloister Walk, a book about Christianity, spirituality, and rediscovered faith.

Struggling with her return to the Christian church after many years away, Kathleen Norris found it was the language of Christianity that most distanced her from faith. Words like "judgment," "faith," "dogma," "salvation," "sinner"—even "Christ"—formed what she called her "scary vocabulary," words that had become so codified or abstract that their meanings were all but impenetrable. She found she had to wrestle with them and make them her own before they could confer their blessings and their grace. Blending history, theology, storytelling, etymology, and memoir, Norris uses these words as a starting point for reflection, and offers a moving account of her own gradual conversion. She evokes a rich spirituality rooted firmly in the chaos of everyday life—and offers believers and doubters alike an illuminating perspective on how we can embrace ancient traditions and find faith in the contemporary world.
  StFrancisofAssisi | Apr 29, 2019 |
Kathleen Norris writes poetically about Christian spirituality. And she has a gift of connecting with her readers both of faith and of doubt. I constantly find that she is putting words to my feelings, and this book is no different.

Amazing Grace is a collection of short stories arranged by topic, and which act as small meditatiions on a theme - grace, incarnation. ( )
  patl | Feb 18, 2019 |
From the publisher:

"Struggling with her return to the Christian church after many years away, Kathleen Norris found it was the language of Christianity that most distanced her from faith. Words like "judgment," "faith," "dogma," "salvation," "sinner"'even "Christ"'formed what she called her "scary vocabulary," words that had become so codified or abstract that their meanings were all but impenetrable. She found she had to wrestle with them and make them her own before they could confer their blessings and their grace. Blending history, theology, storytelling, etymology, and memoir, Norris uses these words as a starting point for reflection, and offers a moving account of her own gradual conversion. She evokes a rich spirituality rooted firmly in the chaos of everyday life'and offers believers and doubters alike an illuminating perspective on how we can embrace ancient traditions and find faith in the contemporary world."
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  St-Johns-Episcopal | Jun 17, 2017 |
Great book. I had been hounding my men's bible study group to read it and discuss it as a group (I eventually gave up on that and decided to just read it on my own); after reading it, I believe more than ever that there is a terrific amount of material to discuss, with most chapters only a few pages long. Kathleen Norris provides thoughts on many terms associated with the Chritian faith, and many of her comments will provoke some soul-searching, by members of all Christian traditions. Something for everyone. And great for those that are seeking to understand some of the words we Christians seem to throw around believing that everyone else understands what we are saying. A very good read in my opinion. ( )
  highlander6022 | Mar 16, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
O to grace how great a debtor...Robert Robertson-"Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing"
Dedication
For my husband David
First words
I was about sixteen years of age when I discovered the word "eschatology."
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"Struggling with her return to the Christian church after many years away, Kathleen Norris found it was the language of Christianity that most distanced her from faith. Words like "judgment", "faith", "dogma", "salvation", "sinner" -- even "Christ" -- formed what she called her "scary vocabulary", words that had become so codified or abstract that their meanings were all but impenetrable. She found she had to wrestle with them and make them her own before they could confer their blessings and their grace. Blending history, theology, story-telling, etymology, and memoir, Norris uses these words as a starting point for reflection, and offers a moving account of her own gradual conversion. She evokes a rich spirituality rooted firmly in the chaos of everyday life -- and offers believers and doubters alike an illuminating perspective on how we can embrace ancient traditions and find faith in the contemporary world." -- from back cover.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.13)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 28
3.5 5
4 84
4.5 10
5 55

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,787,043 books! | Top bar: Always visible