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The Accidental Asian: Notes of a Native…
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The Accidental Asian: Notes of a Native Speaker

by Eric Liu

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Showing 4 of 4
I read this book years ago, and remember identifying very strongly with it. Will post a proper review after a re-read. ( )
  catalogthis | May 5, 2011 |
This book is written by a ABC (American Born Chinese). It was a good book to read to give me a glimpse of what it is like to not be mainstream white in our society even when you consider yourself 100% American. There is worth in reading this if you are adopting transracially. There is even a chapter near the end of the book where he speculated what it much be like to be an Asian adopted by white parents and how you find yourself in that case. Worth the read. ( )
  autumnesf | May 20, 2008 |
Essay collection on the Chinese American experience. Historical, literary, informed and informative in poetic writing. Insightful and well-spoken words for common Asian American dichotomy of experiences, powerful and moving sketch especially of father in the first essay. Youthful, searching, contemporary and intelligent. ( )
1 vote sungene | Oct 29, 2007 |
Social Science
-Sciology, Asian American identity
  jmdcbooks | Sep 28, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0375704868, Paperback)

As a second-generation Chinese-American, Eric Liu has grown up with an awkward relationship to race and ethnic identity. He can follow a conversation in Chinese, although he would have problems if he tried to take part in it; as for the written language, he is functionally illiterate. He would be the first person to question which of his personality traits are "Chinese" or "American," "Asian" or "white," or none of the above, and The Accidental Asian is, in fact, a rigorous self-examination--not merely about the costs and benefits of assimilation, but about whether assimilation should even be viewed in those terms.

Whether he's recalling his adolescent frustration with "Chinese hair" that just wouldn't permit itself to be styled, examining the history of Chinatown, or pondering the mixture of fear and fascination with which China is viewed by Americans, Liu writes with admirable personal intensity. It doesn't matter whether you consider The Accidental Asian to be a memoir or a batch of interconnected essays; once you've read it, you will be forced to consider for yourself what place, if any, race has in America today (but even more so tomorrow).

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:12 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

In these compellingly candid essays, Liu reflects on his life as a second-generation Chinese American and reveals the shifting frames of ethnic identity. Finding himself unable to read a Chinese memorial book about his father's life, he looks critically at the cost of his own assimiliation. But he casts an equally questioning eye on the effort to sustain vast racial categories. And as he surveys the rising anxiety about China's influence, Liu illuminates the space that Asians have always occupied in the American imagination.… (more)

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