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Resurrection of the Son of God (Christian…
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Resurrection of the Son of God (Christian Origins & Ques God 3) (original 2003; edition 2003)

by N T Wright

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1,33798,424 (4.58)1 / 15
Member:tim.dieppe
Title:Resurrection of the Son of God (Christian Origins & Ques God 3)
Authors:N T Wright
Info:SPCK Publishing (2003), Paperback, 848 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Resurrection of the Son of God by N. T. Wright (2003)

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I never thought I would read this book, it took a lot of time to finish this book. I would recommend this only if you are seriously interested in knowing, "What really happened at Easter?"

Thanks to Wright, I understand a lot about the early beliefs of life after death.
I enjoyed his writings on Early Church fathers.
All the way from Paul to Tertullian, they firmly believed and knew Christ died on the cross and bodily rose from the dead.

Resurrection has always been controversial, people in the ancient world knew, just like us, they knew that once a person died, it is a one-way street.

This book inspired me on a deeper level of my faith.

Overall, I really enjoyed Wright's writing and appreciate his work.
( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
I never thought I would read this book, it took a lot of time to finish this book. I would recommend this only if you are seriously interested in knowing, "What really happened at Easter?"

Thanks to Wright, I understand a lot about the early beliefs of life after death.
I enjoyed his writings on Early Church fathers.
All the way from Paul to Tertullian, they firmly believed and knew Christ died on the cross and bodily rose from the dead.

Resurrection has always been controversial, people in the ancient world knew, just like us, they knew that once a person died, it is a one-way street.

This book inspired me on a deeper level of my faith.

Overall, I really enjoyed Wright's writing and appreciate his work.
( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
"The Resurrection of the Son of God' by NT Wright is a scholarly analysis of the historical evidence for Jesus' resurrection. Dr. NT Wright, the Bishop of Durham, exhaustively looks at primary sources. His bibliography extends for 40 pages. He reviews what the pagan world believed about the resurrection, what the Jewish world believed, in the Old Testament, the intertestamental period and the New Testament era, what Christians believed in the New Testament, and in the early writings of Christian fathers up to the time to Eusebius. With his detailed historical analysis, he conclusively shows the Jews, specifically the Pharisees, believed in a bodily resurrection, the Sadducees did not, nor did the various pagan religions. The early Christians followed the Pharisees in their beliefs, but tied it to Jesus as the Messiah.

Dr. Wright asks, "Why did the Christians have these beliefs?" Using standard historical analysis, he feels the best explanation is that 1) the tomb was empty; and 2) Jesus appeared to the disciples.

His concluding chapter analyzes the meaning of this historical evidence and what it means in our post-modern age.

This is a logical, well-written, outstanding Christian apologetic from a historian's view point. Five stars. ( )
1 vote jjvors | Sep 30, 2015 |
This work covers ancient beliefs about life after death from Homer's Hades to ancient Jewish beliefs, from the Bible to the Dead Sea Scrolls and beyond. It examines early Christian beliefs about resurrection in general and that of Jesus in particular, beginning with Paul and working through to the start of the third century. It explores the Easter stories of the Gospels and seeks the best historical conclusions about the empty tomb and the belief that Jesus did rise bodily from the dead.
1 vote Priory | Aug 27, 2013 |
This tome is extremely thorough, yet not dry. Wright's insights and some humour help to make this work a delightful read. Although, if you are looking for a survey of this topic you might want to refer to his work "Suprised by Hope". Note, however that this book is the 3rd in a series, so he constantly refers back to the first two books. At times, you also have to be patient with Wright while he is building up his point. Luckily though most of this work has already been done in the first two books of this series. ( )
2 vote aevaughn | Nov 8, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
The Resurrection of the Son of God is the third volume in the series Christian Origins and the Question of God by prolific biblical scholar N.T. Wright. As Wright explains in his preface, this book began as the final chapter of the series’ second volume, Jesus and the Victory of God (1996). It is amazing to consider that this 800-plus page book was ori- ginally intended as a 70 page chapter. Fortunately for scholars and students, this very important topic eventually received the space it deserves.
Wright begins with a fascinating chapter that wrestles with the entire issue of historical investigation into a cornerstone of faith. While acknowledging the limitations of historical investigation, Wright does conclude that the resurrection of Jesus is not just a matter of faith, but an event to be examined and explored.
Wright then begins his survey of ancient religious and philosophical texts with a look at the pagan view of life after death. In this, Wright focuses on the Hellenistic traditions and concludes that most Greeks believed in some sort of post-death existence but explicitly denied the idea of a physical resurrection.
added by aevaughn | editJournal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism, Stephen Bedard
 
The book's (admittedly crooked) trajectory zigzags through Homer (the "Old Testament" of "the ancient non-Jewish world") and Plato to the Hebrew Bible to the intertestamental literature to the epistles of Paul to the Apostolic Fathers to the Gospels. At each point along the way, Wright shows how the spectrum of pagan beliefs about the afterlife simply did not include resurrection. Indeed, within the Platonic tradition, there would have been hostility to the idea. He also shows how within Judaism, belief in bodily resurrection developed naturally as part of its fundamental affirmation of the goodness of creation and the justice of Israel's covenant God. If the body is a prison (as Plato and others taught) and death is a welcome release, resurrection (a re-embodied life after life after death) would be a bad idea. Conversely, if embodiment is "very good" (as Moses and others taught), any other kind of life after death would be second-rate.
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0800626796, Paperback)

Why did Christianity begin, and why did it take the shape it did? To answer this question – which any historian must face – renowned New Testament scholar N.T. Wright focuses on the key points: what precisely happened at Easter? What did the early Christians mean when they said that Jesus of Nazareth had been raised from the dead? What can be said today about his belief?

This book, third is Wright’s series Christian Origins and the Question of God, sketches a map of ancient beliefs about life after death, in both the Greco-Roman and Jewish worlds. It then highlights the fact that the early Christians’ belief about the afterlife belonged firmly on the Jewish spectrum, while introducing several new mutations and sharper definitions. This, together with other features of early Christianity, forces the historian to read the Easter narratives in the gospels, not simply as late rationalizations of early Christian spirituality, but as accounts of two actual events: the empty tomb of Jesus and his "appearances."

How do we explain these phenomena? The early Christians’ answer was that Jesus had indeed been bodily raised from the dead; that was why they hailed him as the messianic "son of God." No modern historian has come up with a more convincing explanation. Facing this question, we are confronted to this day with the most central issues of the Christian worldview and theology.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:29 -0400)

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