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On The Wealth of Nations by P. J. O'Rourke
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On The Wealth of Nations (2007)

by P. J. O'Rourke

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The chapter reviewing the rise of Western Civ is perhaps the most concise and accessible description of World History around. ( )
  bensdad00 | Jan 10, 2017 |
PJ on the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith. Parts of the book are so funny that you can't help but laugh out loud but a lot of it seems repetitive and recycled In short, he is not overly critical of the world's first bestselling economist and tries to interpret his tome in his own funny and quirky way.
  danoomistmatiste | Jan 24, 2016 |
PJ on the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith. Parts of the book are so funny that you can't help but laugh out loud but a lot of it seems repetitive and recycled In short, he is not overly critical of the world's first bestselling economist and tries to interpret his tome in his own funny and quirky way.
  kkhambadkone | Jan 17, 2016 |
If you have read Wealth of Nations, and forgot about it, this is the book for you.

O'Rourke has read the book and tell you the bullet points of the essential on the main ideas of the book, plus his modern opinions on how wrong the premise is, given it is written so long ago.

You will like it if you disagreed when you read Wealth of Nations, as it turned out, O'Rourke disagreed with some of the points too.

But that is not why you will like this book.

You like it, because O'Rourke review the book like a modern book reviewer, he looked also into the life of Smith and tried to dig out the interesting bits of his personal life that satify the People-Magazine-reading inner you.

Yes, that's what you like about it. It is light, it is refreshing, and finally, you could at least cite some of the key point of Wealth of Nations (as O'Rourke did quote directly from the book) and talk your way through in dinner party and whatever occassion that you need to bring this up.

So, enjoy. ( )
  XOX | Sep 19, 2011 |
PJ O’Rourke is an American humourist who is no longer funny. He’s been tasked with writing a commentary on The Wealth of Nations. Let’s see how he does.[return][return]To start with, not badly. I actually laughed at some things, and found others, such as PJ’s explanation of how we came to have a trading class in the first place, insightful without being dull. All good. Plus we have some context setting in terms of the era in which Adam Smith was writing.[return][return]Then it all goes wrong...http://icantstopreading.blogspot.com/2008/02/on-wealth-of-nations-by-pj-orourke.html
  lorelorn_2008 | Jan 5, 2011 |
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A bank is an institution that doesn't deal in money. If we accept Smith's definition of value as "toil and trouble," banks deal in toil and trouble. Banking is a clever device for storing your toil and trouble. And instead of being charged storage fees, you're compensated for engaging in excess toil and going for extra trouble.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0871139499, Hardcover)

As one of the first titles in Atlantic Monthly Press’ “Books That Changed the World” series, America’s most provocative satirist, P. J. O’Rourke, reads Adam Smith’s revolutionary The Wealth of Nations so you don’t have to. Recognized almost instantly on its publication in 1776 as the fundamental work of economics, The Wealth of Nations was also recognized as really long:  the original edition totaled over nine hundred pages in two volumes—including the blockbuster sixty-seven-page “digression concerning the variations in the value of silver during the course of the last four centuries,” which, “to those uninterested in the historiography of currency supply, is like reading Modern Maturity in Urdu.” Although daunting, Smith’s tome is still essential to understanding such current hot-topics as outsourcing, trade imbalances, and Angelina Jolie. In this hilarious, approachable, and insightful examination of Smith and his groundbreaking work, P. J. puts his trademark wit to good use, and shows us why Smith is still relevant, why what seems obvious now was once revolutionary, and why the pursuit of self-interest is so important.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:22 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

An upbeat dissemination of Adam Smith's "The Wealth of Nations" and "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" condenses and illuminates the key points of the original works while discussing how their messages remain relevant.

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