HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Map of Bones (The Fire Sermon) by…
Loading...

The Map of Bones (The Fire Sermon)

by Francesca Haig

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
516229,653 (3.9)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 5 of 5
This book was a wonderful follow up to The Fire Sermon. With the resistance scattered and potentially falling apart it's up to Cass, and her dwindling group of friends to find out if there really is an Elsewhere and to find out where the mysterious Ark is located. I did find Cass' character to be a bit weak in this book. She shied away from having to kill and I understand that she finds that the fact that it kills that persons twin to be a conflict she cannot justify by killing someone. I still want her to get past that and realize that there has to be some sacrifice at times in order to achieve the outcome you want. Maybe she will realize this more in the next book. I found all the other characters developing nicely as you learn more about their past. Overall an excellent book in the series. I highly recommend it. ( )
  Verkruissen | Sep 9, 2017 |
***This book was reviewed for the San Francisco Book Review***

Map of Bones is the second in Haig’s Fire Sermon series. The resistance has scattered, victim to Council predations. Zoe, Piper, and Cass make their convoluted way back to resistance leadership, through a maze of obstacles and diversions.

Along the way, they collect a former resistance leader named Sally, and the maddened seer she now tends. Xander is Cass’ future, once the visions begin to eat away at mind and heart. Xander still sees, but in fragments he can't fully articulate. From Sally, they learn of the Ark, a place of the Before, that becomes both their Grail and their white whale.

After forging a tenuous alliance with the most unlikely of allies, the resistance manages to retake the town of New Hobart. Learning more of Zach’s plans for the Omegas, Cass and Piper begin to search for the Ark in earnest, hoping it will give them a way to find Elsewhere. What they find is less than they hoped and more than they could ever imagine.

I love how the Ark document fragments are woven in, providing a wealth of information for us the outside readers that the readers of the documents themselves can't make heads or tails of. Once they find the Ark papers, there's a definite Pern feel to things, like when the Pernese find the ships and tech from the original settlers. I really hope that we learn what triggered such a holocaust of fire in the first place, and how it was that there was time to prepare the Ark. If there was time for that, why was there not time to staunch the madness that unleashed such mutual destruction?

I’m actually starting to like the Ringmaster. I hope we learn his real name, and that he's able to continue evolving. It’s nice to see that even one as hardened and privileged as a Council member can begin to see things differently, no matter how slow or skewed it is at first.

Haha. Big smile. I enjoyed picking out the references to the biblical Ark built by Noah. It was a 'dove’ that found them after the events in the Ark, which….ironically, was destroyed by flooding. (Paloma's arrival also signifies the reintroduction of beneficial technology and an end to the fraternal twinning, another inverted Ark reference, as is a world destroyed by fire rather than flood) I am guessing we are going to encounter a person or place with a rainbow oriented name, or other rainbow tie in the next volume. Since these references are oft inverted, perhaps a positive gay reference. A key player from Elsewhere who is such maybe, since the rainbow was a sign of healing in Noah’s story, and the promise of no more global flooding to punish mankind.) I understand the reasoning, but I kinda think Maze of Bones would have been a better title than Map.

Haig’s latest novel is fast-paced and well-drawn, easy to lose yourself in. I was so disappointed when I reached the end. I’ll be counting the months until the next in the series released. Then I get the pleasure of reading these again!

🎻🎻🎻🎻🎻 Highly recommended for fans of Suzanne Collin’s The Hunger Games and the Red Rising trilogy by Pierce Brown. ( )
  PardaMustang | Jun 24, 2016 |
I spent a lot of time on this book because I was distracted by a family emergency the first time through. I didn't want to give a poor rating to a book that didn't deserve it. However, a second reading was no better. The writing is well done but the connection between the narration and the story is missing. I don't remember details from book 1 and the constant reference to past events without those details is frustrating. Many books use references to past events but briefly clue you in to what happened. Not here and it went on and on. Much of the first half is spent walking and talking , then walking and not talking, lost in memories.(same ones over and over) The characters were dull, the descriptions boring, not much happens for a long time and I had to force myself to open book each time after stopping.
I gave it two stars for being well written and edited and also because my preference for snappy backtalk and fast action always has some influence on the rating. ( )
  florabundi | May 10, 2016 |
I have never heard of the first book, The Fire Sermon. So I did not know that this book was the second one until I read the premise. Yet, I have read many books out of order and this is how I can judge how well the author writes if I can jump into the story without any issues and if I want to continue with the series or trilogy. Well I am happy to report that I was able to jump right into this book with no problems. Although at first I was growing weary of the repeated mentions of events in the first book, however, the further I got into the story the more I realized that the repeated mentions of the past is what is shaping Cass, Zoe, and Piper. Even though I have a really good idea of what happened in the prior novel, I still want to go back and pick up a copy of the Fire Sermon to read. The Map of Bones is an intriguing, refreshing breathe of fresh air. ( )
  Cherylk | May 1, 2016 |
It seems as though every writer who wants to make their name big in a hurry says, “Hey, I’ll write a dystopian YA trilogy.” Francesca Haig is a poet of some renown, and I have to wonder what made her decide on this genre.

That said, being a poet, where it’s all about saying more in fewer, but more potent, words, serves her well. Her writing is richly descriptive and the vocabulary is beautiful. She describes scenes and emotions vividly. (That would account for the higher Lexile of these books.)

Yes, the formula is more-or-less followed. Young woman with a special gift, who feels responsible for some of the bad in the world around her. Oppressive society in which one group is pitted against another. No love triangle, at least.

In trying to stay with her twin, Zach, Cass inadvertently gives him a hatred of Omegas. He can’t exterminate them, though, for if one twin dies, the other does, too. They feel each other’s pain. But Zach comes up with a startling plan to make Omegas “disappear” nonetheless, and it is this plan which Cass and her associates discover and fight to stop.

The first book sets up the action, and is not without its climactic and heartbreaking moments. I received book two as an advance reader copy, and was glad that my library had the first book available. It’s a shame there wasn’t a longer wait for it—that means not enough people are reading it!

I could not have understood the second book without having read the first. The author does spend some time on exposition, but there is a lot that would have gone right past me without it. I look forward to reading the third installment.

I recently reviewed the second book of another dystopian YA series, Glass Sword. This hits the mark in all the ways in which that one let me down. Yes, it’s a middle volume. They always consist of a lot of stage-setting for the climactic volume, but this one does so in a more satisfying way.

My biggest criticism is that a lot of time is spent in just traveling, in the first book and even more in the second. It’s somewhat like the final Harry Potter volume in that respect. It could probably have been tightened up and been even better.

Possible Objectionable Material:
A couple of same-gender couples. Violent deaths, not graphically described. Physical mutations described, such as missing limbs or having three eyes. A couple sleeps together; it is left to the reader to decide if they are lovers.

Who Might Like This Book:
Fans of the genre. Strong female protagonist, but shouldn’t put off the male readers if they can handle Katniss and Tris. Late middle-school on up. I’m older than the target demographic and quite enjoyed it. Approximate Lexile: 1090

Thank you, NetGalley, for the ARC of The Map of Bones. ( )
  swingdancefan | Mar 31, 2016 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated, with love and gratitude, to my parents, Alan and Sally, who shared with me their enduring passion for words.
First words
Each time he came to me in dreams, I saw him as I'd seen him the first time: floating.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 147676719X, Hardcover)

Book Two in the critically acclaimed The Fire Sermon trilogy—The Hunger Games meets Cormac McCarthy’s The Road in this richly imagined post-apocalyptic series by award-winning poet Francesca Haig.

Four hundred years in the future, the Earth has turned primitive following a nuclear fire that has laid waste to civilization and nature. Though the radiation fallout has ended, for some unknowable reason every person is born with a twin. Of each pair, one is an Alpha—physically perfect in every way; and the other an Omega—burdened with deformity, small or large. With the Council ruling an apartheid-like society, Omegas are branded and ostracized while the Alphas have gathered the world’s sparse resources for themselves. Though proclaiming their superiority, for all their effort, Alphas cannot escape one harsh fact: whenever one twin dies, so does the other.

Cass is a rare Omega, one burdened with psychic foresight. While her twin, Zach, gains power on the Alpha Council, she dares to dream the most dangerous dream of all: equality. For daring to envision a world in which Alphas and Omegas live side-by-side as equals, both the Council and the Resistance have her in their sights.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 11 Feb 2016 02:30:30 -0500)

"Book Two in the critically acclaimed The Fire Sermon trilogy--The Hunger Games meets Cormac McCarthy's The Road in this richly imagined post-apocalyptic series by award-winning poet Francesca Haig. Four hundred years in the future, the Earth has turned primitive following a nuclear fire that has laid waste to civilization and nature. Though the radiation fallout has ended, for some unknowable reason every person is born with a twin. Of each pair, one is an Alpha--physically perfect in every way; and the other an Omega--burdened with deformity, small or large. With the Council ruling an apartheid-like society, Omegas are branded and ostracized while the Alphas have gathered the world's sparse resources for themselves. Though proclaiming their superiority, for all their effort, Alphas cannot escape one harsh fact: whenever one twin dies, so does the other. Cass is a rare Omega, one burdened with psychic foresight. While her twin, Zach, gains power on the Alpha Council, she dares to dream the most dangerous dream of all: equality. For daring to envision a world in which Alphas and Omegas live side-by-side as equals, both the Council and the Resistance have her in their sights"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.9)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 4
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,724,275 books! | Top bar: Always visible