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Four Views on Hell: Second Edition…
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Four Views on Hell: Second Edition (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology)

by Preston Sprinkle (Editor)

Other authors: Denny Burk (Contributor), Stanley N. Gundry (Series Editor), Robin Parry (Contributor), John G. Stackhouse, Jr (Contributor), Jerry Walls (Contributor)

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Ever since Rob Bell's Love Wins, evangelicals have rushed to the defense of the traditional doctrine of hell. Bell's book was more suggestion than substance and raised the most ire among those who never read it, but there have also been a number of intelligent treatments on the fate of unbelievers and the nature of hell. Four Views on Hell, Second Edition showcases four options currently being discussed among evangelicals. Under the editorial eye of Preston Sprinkle (coauthor of Erasing Hell) with contributions from Denny Burk, John G. Stackhouse Jr, Robin Parry and Jerry Walls, this book presents the case for hell as eternal conscious torment, annihilationism, universalism and purgatory.

9780310516460_5This new edition of Four Views on Hell reveal how the contours of the debate have changed since the publication of the first edition in 1992. The original edition had two contributors arguing hell consists as 'eternal conscious torment,' one arguing for literal fire (John Walvoord) and metaphorical (William Crocket), one contributor arguing for annilationism (Clark Pinnock) and a Catholic contributor extols the virtues of purgatory (Zachary Hayes). In the current edition, the traditional doctrine on hell is represented by Burk. Burk doesn't take eternal fire as a literal flame as Walvoord did (28), though he does emphasize the eternal aspects of hell's duration. John Stackhouse takes up Pinnock's mantle in arguing the terminal/conditionalist/annihilationist position. Parry provides the biblical, theological case for Christian universalism (a new tothis edition) having previously published The Evangelical Universalist (under the pseudonym of Gregory McDonald). Jerry Walls gives a protestant case for purgatory for the faithful who die in Christ, arguing that purgatory is not about offering satisfaction for sin (which Christ offered on our behalf) but is about sanctification.

Each of these contributors has their strengths. After sharing a brief parable illustrating the seriousness of sin being measured 'by the value of the one sin against,' Burke makes the biblical case for hell as eternal conscious torment (19) based on ten foundational passages drawn from both testaments. Stackhouse also makes a strong exegetical and theological case for annilationism, arguing that eternal punishment and 'unquenchable fire' indicate the certainty of implications rather than duration, and eternal life is a gift to those who are in Christ. Parry's chapter emphasizes how Christ came to restore all things, and how having a sinner suffer eternal torment, or the eradication of a sinner doesn't appear to embody that end. Parry places his case within a biblical theological frame, emphasing the scope and trajectory of redemption. Walls is the odd man out in that he affirms with Burk the the reality of eternal conscious torment for those who are in hell, and posits purgatory, for those who trust in Christ as their savior (though he does allow for a post-mordem conversion). The respondents each give strong critiques of one-another's views, citing their various interpretive strategies, their use of theology, and interpretive strategies.

I generally don't find these 'four views' books to be exciting reading. Because of the way they are organized, a brief case with critical responses, by the time you get to last couple of chapters, you already have a pretty good idea of what the author will say before you read it. The effect is mitigated somewhat in this volume in that Parry's and Wall's chapters are by far the most interesting chapters in this volume. And Sprinkle has a fantastic concluding essay which highlights the relative strengths of each response.

The Christians with whom I hang around with most generally hold to the traditional view of hell, though I find the arguments for annihilationism to be fairly convincing. Sprinkle makes the case in his conclusion that annihilationism is the only view that logically precludes the possibility of Christian universalism, because if hell is eternal, that than there is the possibility of redemption (205). Certainly if Burke is right and Hell is wholly punitive, than the possibility remains unlikely. Parry's case sets universalism with in Christocentric framework with a hopeful trajectory (Stackhouse calls the case for univeralism ' the triumph of hope over exegesis', p.134). I am interested in exploring Parry's argument further and will likely read his Evangelical Universalist. Because of the brevity of each chapter, no respondent in this volume makes as comprehensive of a case as they otherwise could have, and each overstates their case in places. I give this four stars.

Note: I received this book from BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review. ( )
  Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sprinkle, PrestonEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burk, DennyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gundry, Stanley N.Series Editorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Parry, RobinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stackhouse, John G., JrContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walls, JerryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0310516463, Paperback)

Recent years have seen much controversy regarding hell: Do we go to heaven or hell when we die? Or do we cease to exist? Are believers and unbelievers ultimately saved in the end?

This second edition of Four Views on Hell, featuring all new contributors, highlights why the church still needs to wrestle with the doctrine of hell. In the familiar counterpoints format, four leading scholars introduce us to the current views on eternal judgment, with particular attention being given to the new voices that have entered the debate.

Contributors and views include:

Denny Burk: Eternal Conscious Torment John Stackhouse: Annihilationism (Conditional Immortality) Robin Parry: Universalism (Ultimate Reconciliation) Jerry Walls: Purgatory

General editor Preston Sprinkle concludes the discussion by evaluating each view, noting significant points of exchange between the essayists. The interactive nature of the volume allows the reader to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of each view and come to an informed conclusion.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 14 Mar 2016 12:00:15 -0400)

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