HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Slave Trade (Events and Outcomes) by Tom…
Loading...

The Slave Trade (Events and Outcomes)

by Tom Monaghan

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
711,138,814NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Not sure when i will get to read this but was interested to read more about Jean-Baptiste Belley,ca. 1740-1805.

Jean-Baptiste Belley, also known as Mars, was a former slave from Saint-Domingue who became one of the first Black men to hold elective office in France. Born in the West African island of Goreé, part of present-day Senegal, Belley was sold into slavery as a toddler, eventually arriving in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. Along the way, he became educated and was able to purchase his freedom as an adult. In 1793, following the French Revolution, he was elected as the only Black member of a three person coalition sent to France to represent the colony of Saint-Domingue in the National Convention, where he spoke in defense of the Abolition of slavery on February 1794. Slavery was briefly abolished in the French colonies that same year, only to be reinstated after Napoleon’s rise to power five years later. Belley stayed as a member of the Convention, and later the Council of the Five Hundred, until losing his seat in 1797. He then obtained a position in the gendarmerie nationale and returned to Saint-Domingue on official missions. While in France, his portrait was painted by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson, a pupil of Jacques-Louis David. Belley returned to Saint-Domingue with Charles LeClerc in 1802, the year slavery was reinstated in the French colonies, and was arrested on orders of Napoleon Bonaparte. He travelled again to France, this time as a prisoner, where he died in 1805.

The portrait is currently at the Musée national du Château de Versailles.

“Mars” is such a badass nickname.
  velvetink | Mar 31, 2013 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Presents an overview of the development, expansion, consequences, and eventual abolition of the slave trade.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,058,234 books! | Top bar: Always visible