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Something Is Rotten in Fettig: A Satire by…
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Something Is Rotten in Fettig: A Satire

by Jere Krakoff

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209515,329 (3.89)2

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
The law receives justice of a literary sort in this satirical tale by attorney-novelist Krakoff. Unlike the typical, fat, legal thriller—a glossy fantasy of wealth and power filled with the noble and the devilish—Krakoff’s canvas is absurdist comedy, his goal edification rather than escapism. Something is Rotten in Fettig is a funny book, that’s the main thing; but behind the comedy, which ranges from dry to zany and even black, there’s an air of surrealism, a sense in which we see society devolving before our eyes.

http://thenervousbreakdown.com/kbaumeister/2017/08/the-nervous-breakdowns-review... ( )
  kurtbaumeister | Oct 25, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Amusing satire. The author has an eye for detail and an ear for language, and lampoons everything from courtroom procedure to personal relationships. Lots of fun at the expense of bureaucracy. His wry names for people and places often had me chuckling, such as the National Library of Pedantic Writings. Fun read! ( )
  runeshower | Dec 20, 2016 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I started reading "Something is Rotten in Fettig" knowing nothing about its author, Jere Krakoff. As I progressed through the book, and as political actions and legal proceeding joined the storyline, I couldn't help but think "this guy's been here, done that."

So I visited Krakoff's website, read the bio page and learned that was, indeed, the case. A civil rights attorney with a penchant for advocacy, Krakoff's life and career provided plenty of inspiration from the real world, which has found its way into his satirical novel, into its characters, the institutions they represent (or combat), and the changing course of their lives.

It's good stuff ... and it makes for a good read, with characters we come to care for, and others we come to despise - get into the spirit of this tale, and feel free to boo and hiss at them as they enter the stage. There's a good pacing to the story, with plenty of developments to keep you interested - and chuckling - until you reach an end to the story that may surprise you.

And like all good satirical works, there is a foundation of truth underneath all the personal/familial/cultural/political/legal craziness of "Something is Rotten in Fettig." Just when you find yourself, saying "no way," a voice in the back of your mind says, "hey, remember that time when ...?" It happened to me more than once as I read the book and recalled my own experience in Texas as a student clerk for two State District Court judges and, later as a journalist.

I strongly recommend Krakoff's inaugural work to you. Me, I'm already looking forward to his next. According to that web page I mentioned earlier, "... the author is working on another satirical novel. It concerns a fictitious Republic's Supreme Court ..."

I am VERY much looking forward to it.
__________

NOTE: I received a free e-copy of this work through LibraryThing in exchange for a review. ( )
  JeffMcDonald | Oct 27, 2016 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Try as I might I could not finish this book. I found it to be very heavy reading that I just could not get into. Neither the story line nor the characters caught my interest. ( )
  Shoosty | Sep 19, 2016 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
There really is something very rotten in Fettig. Our hero, Leopold Plotkin, is accused of a crime that didn't exist and thrown into Purgatory to await his fate His extended family are more of a hindrance than help, but luckily his only childhood friend comes to his rescue, finding him legal representation. But that is only the beginning of his uphill trek to regain his freedom in the face of a legal system that does everything to send him back to Purgatory. The good guys are likable and the bad guys are detestable. I loved the names of the people and places. I am sure with the characters name's that there were a lot of references that I just didn't get. A very funny, quirky book. ( )
  eaheimer | Jul 27, 2016 |
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