HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The South, The Nation, and The World:…
Loading...

The South, The Nation, and The World: Perspectives on Southern Economic…

by David L. Carlton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
13None723,089NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0813921856, Paperback)

Like the rest of British North America, the American South was "born capitalist." The slave plantation, then, was essentially a form of business enterprise like any other—indeed, one quite modern and sophisticated for its time. There were initially very few significant differences in business culture between the northern and southern parts of what became the United States. Yet the plantation placed its peculiar stamp on the South, and vice versa, and its path of development diverged increasingly from that of the growing manufacturing belt of the North.

In their essays collected in The South, the Nation, and the World, David Carlton and Peter Coclanis effectively argue that the chronic economic difficulties of the American South cannot simply be explained away as resulting from a distinctive "premodern" business climate, because there was actually very little variation between one region’s business climate and another’s during the Antebellum period. Instead, it was the collapse of the slave regime in the 1860s that left the South in dire need of economic restructuring, and by Reconstruction the emergent American economy had foreclosed options formerly available to southern enterprise. Forced to play catch-up, southerners have had at best mixed success in the continuing struggle to create an economic life affording stable growth and broad opportunity to all the region’s people—and Carlton and Coclanis offer a fascinating illumination of the twists and turns in that economic history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:37 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,116,686 books! | Top bar: Always visible