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Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to…
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Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

by Jeff Lowenfels, Wayne Lewis, Wayne Lewis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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I can see why this book seems revolutionary – “Don’t roto-till?!” It replaces that work with stuff nearly as involved. Inventory your microbes. Send soil away for a microbe analysis. Make compost tea. Seriously, it does offer some new information. Perennials prefer fungal compost, veggies and annuals prefer bacterial (green) compost. There are also two or three main types of mycorrhizal fungi, and they are available to treat seed.
I saw the difference m-treatment of grass seed made last year. I’m sold on its efficacy. ( )
  2wonderY | Jan 31, 2014 |
The best gardener's guide to how plants grow ever written. This is an easy, but fascinating read. ( )
  khloris | Dec 30, 2008 |
(This review was originally written for The Garden Bloggers' Book club)

After slogging my way through the last book I read, I was disheartened to read in the Preface to Teaming with Microbes: A Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web that the first part of the book would be difficult to get through. I pressed on. Very science-y. An excellent sleep inducer. No joke. I did fall asleep while reading it one warm afternoon. But it was definitely worth it. Like the authors, I urge you to read the entire book and not just the second part which is the heart of the book.

Their argument boils down to one sentence: "No one ever fertilized an old-growth forest". Think about all the wild places you have ever seen, lush with growth. How did they get that way without the help of Scott's or Miracle-Gro? And if Scott's and Miracle-Gro are so superior, why don't our yards and gardens look better than those wild places?

The authors' thesis is that we should garden like Nature gardens, working with the flora and fauna in the soils rather than against it through the use of compost, organic mulches and actively aerated compost tea. Best of all, they provide precise instructions and call for materials that most of us have on hand anyways. No need for expensive ingredients or equipment!

I was thrilled to discover that I am not a "lazy composter" as I have always thought. Instead, I practice cold composting (not turning the compost), a method that produces the most "nutritious" compost! And what I jokingly refer to as "composting in situ", using the mower to shred up leaves and dumping them with the grass clippings onto my beds in the fall is actually a recommended mulch. As are the leaves I leave in my gardens over the winter. The only thing I am doing wrong is removing the leaves in the spring. And my deepest, darkest secret is nothing to be ashamed of. Instead of carefully working my compost into the soil, I just spread it on top. Again, a recommended method for amending the soil!

Of course, there are things that I have to do differently. Such as leaving the leaves on my beds. And even though I don't roto-till, I should still stop "loosening" the soil in the spring when I plant my seeds. The soil should be disturbed as little as possible. Planting in individual holes or narrow furrows is fine. I should learn to make and use actively aerated compost teas. Perhaps most importantly instead of throwing anything and everything into my composter, I should pay closer attention to the individual ingredients and their proportions, maybe go so far as to have different composters to make compost tailored to the needs of the various plants in my gardens.

This is a wonderful book that I will be referring to again and again. Thanks Carol for recommending it. My garden is forever in your debt. ( )
2 vote OldRoses | Jul 26, 2008 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeff Lowenfelsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lewis, Waynemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Lewis, Waynemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Ingham, ElaineForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingham, ElaineForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0881927775, Hardcover)

Smart gardeners know that soil is anything but an inert substance. Healthy soil is teeming with life — not just earthworms and insects, but a staggering multitude of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms. When we use chemical fertilizers, we injure the microbial life that sustains healthy plants, and thus become increasingly dependent on an arsenal of artificial substances, many of them toxic to humans as well as other forms of life. But there is an alternative to this vicious circle: to garden in a way that strengthens, rather than destroys, the soil food web — the complex world of soil-dwelling organisms whose interactions create a nurturing environment for plants. By eschewing jargon and overly technical language, the authors make the benefits of cultivating the soil food web available to a wide audience, from devotees of organic gardening techniques to weekend gardeners who simply want to grow healthy, vigorous plants without resorting to chemicals.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:53 -0400)

Provides information on ways to strengthen and cultivate the soil food web to grow healthy plants without the use of chemicals.

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