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The sapphire rose by David Eddings
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The sapphire rose (1991)

by David Eddings

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3,437182,620 (3.73)20
Aided by the goddess Aphrael, the Pandion Knight Sparhawk and his band of companions have recovered the magical jewel Bhelliom - the sapphire rose - from the cave of Ghwerig. Now they have the power to cure Ehlana, the young queen of Elenia. This is the third volume of The Elenium trilogy.
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Title:The sapphire rose
Authors:David Eddings
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The Sapphire Rose by David Eddings (1991)

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English (16)  Polish (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
The book definitely brings the series to a satisfying conclusion, but the denouement runs a little long (though, to be fair, getting the denouement the right length is something that lots of writers have problems with). Probably the bigger problem with the book's end is that, approaching the conclusion, it screams, "The writer got the publisher to agree to another trilogy, so he's going to lay some plot hooks for the next one!"

This is aggravated by the fact that I'm reading the book's first printing, and right after th end of the story we get this little bombshell.


Here ends The Sapphire Rose, thus concluding the tale of The Elenium -- but not the adventures of Sparhawk and his companions. Watch for further danger and magic in The Tamuli, a new series from David Eddings, forthcoming from Del Rey Books.


Far be it from me to deny an author the right to make all the sequels he wants to his book series, but once it's done, presently surprise me with the next series with these characters, instead of dropping a "Tune In Next Time" on me. It actually ends up lessening the tone of the conclusion, changing things from a satisfying, hard earned conclusion, to a short breather before the next storm comes in. It's clear from the writing that Eddings is aiming for the former, but because of that little pre-advertising blurb at the back, it becomes the latter. ( )
  Count_Zero | Jul 7, 2020 |
Miik, you are still my favorite (well, one of 'em), I'm going to have to get myself some more David Eddings! I did cry when

*****Spoiler*****

Kurik died, but I could live with that. The little twist with Flute made me laugh. ( )
  Amelia1989 | Jun 10, 2019 |
The adventure story was good.

But the marriage of Ehlana and Sparhawk made me very uncomfortable. He is an older experienced warrior. She is young and in very many was inexperienced. Sparhwak had basically raised her as a child until he was exiled when she was eight years old. When he describes how he feels about her it is very paternal. It feels like Ehlana is fulfilling a childhood fantasy by marrying him right away. She hasn't seen him for over half her life. Her letters are very much like speeches. She doesn't write like a young girl in love. ( )
  nx74defiant | Feb 2, 2018 |
The Sapphire Rose is the final book in the David Eddings fantasy trilogy The Elenium, and overall it provides a satisfactory conclusion. There were even a few twists I wasn't expecting. Rather than summarize the book and give away some of the events of the earlier two books, I will simply say that The Sapphire Rose continues to tell the story of Sparhawk's quest to save his queen from death, while at the same time trying to prevent the evil god Azash from getting loose and wreaking havoc on the land. Fans of traditional epic fantasy will likely enjoy this final book, especially if they liked the first two books in the series.

I didn't like the dark, disturbing scenes in the series, nor did I care for the its treatment of the religion of the Elenes. The Elenic religion is a thinly-veiled caricature of Catholicism, and I found it shallow and disingenuous.

Overall, The Elenium is a decent fantasy series, but not one to which I will likely return. ( )
  nsenger | Mar 10, 2017 |
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  Dunsh01 | Mar 6, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eddings, Davidprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eddings, LeighUncredited authorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barrow, JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carlson, ClaudiaMaps (other)secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gatti, GraziaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Johnson, HollyMaps (borders)secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parkinson, KeithCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Punnonen, PasiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shapiro, ShellyMap (Eosia)secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spångberg, YlvaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, GeoffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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You reached up and pulled the fire down from the sky. Love, Me.
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Following the invasion of the Elenic-speaking peoples from the steppes of central Daresia lying to the east, the Elenes gradually migrated westward to displace the thinly scattered Styrics who inhabited the Eosian continent.
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