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A Fatal Appraisal by J. B. Stanley
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This is the second in the Molly Appleby series and a great follow up to A Killer Collection. Molly is headed to Richmond to get behind the scene material on the TV show Antique Treasures. What I particularly enjoy about this series is that Stanley provides the reader with information from the past and ties it in with the mystery. Looking forward to reading book three, A Deadly Dealer. ( )
  FredYoder | May 8, 2015 |
This is the second in the Molly Appleby series and a great follow up to A Killer Collection. Molly is headed to Richmond to get behind the scene material on the TV show Antique Treasures. What I particularly enjoy about this series is that Stanley provides the reader with information from the past and ties it in with the mystery. Looking forward to reading book three, A Deadly Dealer. ( )
  yoder | Sep 20, 2013 |
Molly Appleby, reporter for Collector's Weekly is sent to Richmond to report on the Hidden Treasures TV show being taped at the Museum. She is introduced to the different experts in various areas - furniture, toys, jewelry, books, coins, etc. and as she gets to know them through the interviews she conducts, Molly also learns about the knowledge that each expert garners. Following the experts, Molly sees their personal quirks as well so when Frank (furniture) is exposed to a strange mold and later dies because of an allergic reaction, Molly becomes curious.

When Alexandra (coins) is found murdered in the museum after mentioning that the coins on display there are fakes, Molly delves deeper into the backgrounds of various other experts.

The writing for this cozy was easily presented to the reader, spacing and "quietly" presenting the clues at the same time as taking the reader on a pleasant journey through the antique world. Made me want to visit Richmond and its historical district. ( )
  cyderry | Jan 2, 2013 |
I enjoyed this cozy mystery with the main character being a writer for an antique collectors newspaper. It did bother me when in the secondary story about a desk made during the Revolutionary War the maker is talking about a hidden compartment to hide photographs. Photography was not invented until the 1800s. The black and white photographs in my paperback copy of the book were not clear enough to tell much. I do plan on reading the next book in the series. ( )
  Alice_Wonder | Jun 13, 2010 |
As the writer for the magazine Collector's Weekly Molly Applegate travels to cover all things collectible. In her latest assignment Molly is to cover the hit tv show Hidden Treasures (a fictional Antiques Roadshow). Although she is reluctant to leave her budding office romance with Mark, the magazine's Marketing Director, she is anxious for the chance to see the behind the scenes workings of the popular tv show. After settling into the lovely and cozy bed and breakfast run by the friendly Mrs. Hewell, she goes to the Museum at which the show is being filmed. Many of the cast prove to be nice, open people who are eager to share their knowledge and expertise. But not everyone is so forthcoming and anxious to help. Frank Sterling, the star appraiser, and his wife, who is also the host of the show, are not the friendly type, not with cast members, strangers or even each other. But it is still a surprise when Frank goes missing, only to be found by Molly dead in his car. The police are not sure it is murder until the second body appears.

The setting of the book and the series in the world of collectibles is a brilliant one with limitless potential for story lines. The addition of a story from the past woven into the story in the present is a wonderful glimpse into history. Even in this work of fiction, it highlights the importance of preserving pieces of our heritage. The last chapter "A Brief Note on Hiding Places in Antique Furniture" with pictures of examples of hidden compartments is informative and interesting.

This book can stand alone as a mystery but it would be interesting to see if some of the characters were introduced more thoroughly in the previous book, especially Clara, Molly's mother. It will be fun to see the character of Molly grow as the stories continue. It is not difficult to figure out who dun it but finding out why is an entertaining search.

Molly Appleby was first introduced in A Killer Collection. This is the second in J.B. Stanley's A Collectible Mystery series. She is also the author Carbs and Cadavers, the first in the Supper Club Series. ( )
  FrontStreet | Mar 29, 2008 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stanley, J. B.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adams, Ellerymain authorall editionsconfirmed
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