HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global…
Loading...

Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (edition 2016)

by Parag Khanna (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1103164,354 (4.23)None
Member:esonic
Title:Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization
Authors:Parag Khanna (Author)
Info:Random House (2016), 496 pages
Collections:Your library, Kindle
Rating:***
Tags:economy, globalization, trade, politics, China

Work details

Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
One cannot depend on reading the tea leaves to predict future outcomes but by examining the camel trails and waterways of the past and their resource connectivity in terms of today’s global outreach and commercial infrastructure “connectivity“ rather than possession by warfare pinpoints geographical clusters and not nation states that are the new dynamic force. This book is a must read for anyone interested in the future and strategic outcomes. ( )
  mcdenis | Mar 21, 2018 |
Ho appena finito di leggere questo straordinario libro che si muove tra scienza e fantascienza, geografia e economia, passato e futuro, passando per il presente. Ha una visione veramente globale della storia. Non sono un tecnico, sono soltanto un lettore abbastanza smaliziato per capire che un libro del genere non lo si "impasta" così facilmente. Il giovane autore rappresenta degnamente la nuova generazione di scienziati dell'economia globale che ha le sue radici nella "connectogeografia", la nuova scienza che cerca di connettere l'uomo al suo ambiente in un modo in cui nella sua storia è stato stato mai connesso. ( )
  AntonioGallo | Nov 2, 2017 |
Sees trade in US depending on fostering of already existing "city-states", such as the Texas Triangle (DFW-Houston, San Antonio
  ddonahue | Apr 17, 2016 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812988558, Hardcover)

From the visionary bestselling author of The Second World and How to Run the World comes a bracing and authoritative guide to a future shaped less by national borders than by global supply chains, a world in which the most connected powers—and people—will win.

Connectivity is the most revolutionary force of the twenty-first century. Mankind is reengineering the planet, investing up to ten trillion dollars per year in transportation, energy, and communications infrastructure linking the world’s burgeoning megacities together. This has profound consequences for geopolitics, economics, demographics, the environment, and social identity. Connectivity, not geography, is our destiny.

In Connectography, visionary strategist Parag Khanna travels from Ukraine to Iran, Mongolia to North Korea, Pakistan to Nigeria, and across the Arctic Circle and the South China Sea to explain the rapid and unprecedented changes affecting every part of the planet. He shows how militaries are deployed to protect supply chains as much as borders, and how nations are less at war over territory than engaged in tugs-of-war over pipelines, railways, shipping lanes, and Internet cables. The new arms race is to connect to the most markets—a race China is now winning, having launched a wave of infrastructure investments to unite Eurasia around its new Silk Roads. The United States can only regain ground by fusing with its neighbors into a super-continental North American Union of shared resources and prosperity.

Connectography offers a unique and hopeful vision for the future. Khanna argues that new energy discoveries and technologies have eliminated the need for resource wars; ambitious transport corridors and power grids are unscrambling Africa’s fraught colonial borders; even the Arab world is evolving a more peaceful map as it builds resource and trade routes across its war-torn landscape. At the same time, thriving hubs such as Singapore and Dubai are injecting dynamism into young and heavily populated regions, cyber-communities empower commerce across vast distances, and the world’s ballooning financial assets are being wisely invested into building an inclusive global society. Beneath the chaos of a world that appears to be falling apart is a new foundation of connectivity pulling it together.

Praise for Connectography

“Connectivity has become a basic human right, and gives everyone on the planet the opportunity to provide for their family and contribute to our shared future. Connectography charts the future of this connected world.”—Marc Andreessen, general partner, Andreessen Horowitz

Connectography is ahead of the curve in seeing the battlefield of the future and the new kind of tug-of-war being waged on it. Khanna’s scholarship and foresight are world-class. . . . A must-read for the next president.”—Chuck Hagel, former U.S. secretary of defense

“This bold reframing is an exciting addition to our ongoing debate about geopolitics and the future of globalization.”—Dominic Barton, global managing partner, McKinsey & Company

“This is probably the most global book ever written. It is intensely specific while remaining broad and wide. Its takeaway is that infrastructure is destiny: Follow the supply lines outlined in this book to see where the future flows.”—Kevin Kelly, co-founder, Wired

“There’s no better guide than Khanna to show us all the possibilities of this new hyperconnected world.”—Mathew Burrows, director, Strategic Foresight Initiative at the Atlantic Council, and former counselor, U.S. National Intelligence Council

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 17 Apr 2016 10:42:10 -0400)

"Mankind is reengineering the planet, investing up to ten trillion dollars per year in transportation, energy, and communications infrastructure linking the worlds burgeoning megacities together. This has profound consequences for geopolitics, economics, demographics, the environment, and social identity. Connectivity, not geography, is our destiny. Khanna argues that new energy discoveries and technologies have eliminated the need for resource wars; ambitious transport corridors and power grids are unscrambling Africas fraught colonial borders; even the Arab world is evolving a more peaceful map as it builds resource and trade routes across its war-torn landscape. At the same time, thriving hubs such as Singapore and Dubai are injecting dynamism into young and heavily populated regions, cyber-communities empower commerce across vast distances, and the worlds ballooning financial assets are being wisely invested into building an inclusive global society. Beneath the chaos of a world that appears to be falling apart is a new foundation of connectivity pulling it together." -- Connectivity, not geography, is our destiny. Mankind is reengineering the planet, investing up to ten trillion dollars per year in transportation, energy, and communications infrastructure linking the worlds burgeoning megacities together. Khanna explores the profound consequences this will have for geopolitics, economics, demographics, the environment, and social identity.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.23)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 3
4.5 1
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,537,064 books! | Top bar: Always visible