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Chapterhouse: Dune by Frank Herbert
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Chapterhouse: Dune (1991)

by Frank Herbert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dune (6), Dune Saga (20), Dune: complete chronology (15)

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5,855261,104 (3.71)45

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Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
Chapterhouse: Dune picks up shortly after where Heretics left off. Rakis was destroyed by the Honored Matres, and Miles Teg sacrificed himself so Odrade, Duncan Idaho and Sheeana could escape with a sand worm. They all go to the Bene Gesserit world Chapterhouse, where they hope to get the worm to continue its life cycle and begin producing the spice. The Honored Matres continue hunting down the Bene Gesserit, and the Chapterhouse planet slowly transforms into desert.

Chapterhouse: Dune is fairly inconsistent. The first third of the book is fine, but the second third is a bit of a slog to read through. Nothing really happens aside from dry dialogue and Duncan not liking being confined to a no-ship. The book picks up again towards the end with the final confrontation between the two Sisterhoods. We still get Frank Herbert's world building, but characterization is lacking. The book ends on a cliffhanger, but unfortunately Herbert passed away before he could finish the conclusion. ( )
  Cerelin | May 14, 2018 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Chapterhouse: Dune
Series: Dune Chronicles #6
Author: Frank Herbert
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: SF
Pages: 452
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


The Honored Matres are wiping out Bene Gesserit worlds while on their search for Chapterhouse, the nerve center of Bene Gesserit'ness.

Duncan Idaho and Murbella are on Chapterhouse and Murbella is being trained as a BG Sister to see if Honored Matres CAN make that transition. Duncan is just doing his thing and staying in the no-ship so nobody can find him. He becomes the Teg ghola's weapon master [as he has visions of face dancers and somehow steals info about super advanced weapons from their minds] and in the end takes off in the no-ship with Sheena, Scytale and others.

Scytale continues his bargaining with the Sisterhood but is pretty much stymied.

Darwi Odrade is now Mother Superior and has plans to tame the Honored Matres by melding them with the BG. But to do this she must kill the High Honored Matre and convince the rest of the BG to accept Murbella as a synthesis of the two sisterhoods. She succeeds and dies and Murbella is confirmed as leader of both groups.

It is revealed that the Honored Matres have been fleeing something even more powerful than them and it is now up to Murbella to guide humanity to survival against whatever this “other” threat is while combining the best of the Bene Gesserit with the best of the Honored Matres.

And some Jews. I don't even know why Herbert put them in, but they are shoehorned into this story like nobody's business.

My Thoughts:

This really felt like 2 books. One of those books I liked, the other I thought was a steaming pile of poo poo. And I mean really stinky poo poo.

One book was about sexual obsession (by the author) and child rape and pages and pages of philosophical gobbledy gook that was batted back and forth by cardboard characters like a badminton birdie.

The other book was filled with planets being wiped out by super weapons and the discovery of eternal life through ghola memory being awakened and threats so large that they might be the end of all humanity all across the universe.

I enjoyed the first 10% of this book, then went out of my mind for the next 45% and finally enjoyed the last bit, thankfully. All of that is just to show that I don't hold it against anyone who hates this book, doesn't like it or just think it stinks (like really really really stinky poo). But being the man I am, I was able to go beyond Frank's weaknesses and still enjoy the strengths this book has to offer.

But I had the mantra “why Frank, why?!?” running through my head the entire time. He has huge awesome plot material and tons of cool action stuff and he focuses on conversations about power and sex and religion? For phracks sake man, let it go and just tell a great story like you did with Dune. I think that is what each book after Dune lost out on, telling a good story. Each sequel became the vehicle with which Herbert drove us around his little personal psychology museum and bored us to tears with his ramblings.

One thing about this re-read that I enjoyed, or at least noticed without feeling like I needed to pass judgement, were terms and conditions that ended up being used in the Dune 7 duology by Baby Herbert and KJ Anderson. Noticing those things made me a little more forgiving of them and made me wonder if perhaps they weren't the total wankers I think them to be. Yeah, that'll last until I start reading the Dune 7 duology. Don't worry, there will be no good feelings of comraderie and brotherly love then. Nothing but cold scorn and derision for ruining such an epic as the Dune Chronicles.

So why the 4stars? I'm beginning to wonder myself!
1) The Action. When it happened, it happened fast and furious and there was NO messing about. Death and carnage and billions snuffed out in a heart beat.
2) The Ideas. Once you got past Herbert's obsession with power and the really weird ways he expressed that obsession, some of the points on humanity and how humanity acts and interacts were quite intriguing. I suspect they're not very original, but in SF, it really works.
3) The Direction. This series had moved beyond the Atreides family directly and towards the Gene Gesserit as a whole being a shepherd to humanity. Humanity had gotten larger and so the need for some guidance had gotten larger. Where this was leading was great.

Of course, it ends on a cliffhanger with Duncan and the No-ship in unknown space just hanging out. Like, duuude, where's my spaceship? If you read my initial review from '12 you'll see how I reacted to that. This time around, knowing I had the completed story, no matter from who, that made a difference.

★★★★☆ ( )
2 vote BookstoogeLT | Jan 9, 2018 |
Ahh, Frank, to think this was your last book. The mysteries of Dune just beginning to truly unfold and you leave us.

So, this book delves even deeper into Herbert's sexual obsession. Everything in this story revolves around sex, or some sort of sexual perversion [addiction, child rape, etc].

If you can get past all that, there is actually a good story. Humanity has scattered into the great unknown after Leto II's stifling influence is removed. Now a part of that scattered humanity has returned, bent on conquest and domination: The Honored Matres.

But as the story unfolds, we learn that all is not as it seems. Do the Honored Matres return for pure dominance? Or is there another, a deeper, more chilling reason? One that the Million Worlds SHOULD be very afraid of?

Just as the tension ratchets up, the Bene Gesseret's plan for survival enacted, the book ends. And we are left hanging, wondering.

I can remember reading this in highschool, and feeling betrayed and wondering how an author could do such a thing as dying with a series unfinished. Ahh, the naivete of youth. Robert Jordan hadn't died, Rand Al'thor hadn't been in my mind yet. So this was my first experience with Story Interrupted.

And I stoically accepted it and let it scar my soul. ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
A disappointing end to the Dune series. ( )
  Lukerik | Oct 8, 2015 |
I loved Dune, but each additional novel in the series seems to fall shorter than the last. ( )
  turtlesleap | Aug 16, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
Chapterhouse: Dune is a worthy addition to this durable and deservedly popular series... Against all odds, the universe of Dune keeps getting richer in texture, more challenging in its moral dilemmas. The only way to appreciate Mr. Herbert's achievement is to start with the first book and work your way through, so that when one character says, ''I love you too much, Murbella. That's my Agony,'' you will get the full, shuddery import of that capital A.
 

» Add other authors (22 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Frank Herbertprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenherr, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Those who would repeat the past must control the teaching of history

------------------Bene Gesserit Coda
Dedication
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When the first ghola baby was delivered from the first Bene Gesserit axlotl tank, Mother Superior Darwi Odrade ordered a quiet celebration in her private dining room atop Central.
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AR 5.4, 22 Pts
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0441102670, Mass Market Paperback)

The desert planet Arrakis, called Dune, has been destroyed. Now, the Bene Gesserit, heirs to Dune's power, have colonized a green world--and are turning it into a desert, mile by scorched mile.

Here is the last book Frank Herbert wrote before his death. A stunning climax to the epic Dune legend that will live on forever...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:02 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

The desert planet Arrakis, called Dune, has been destroyed. Now the Bene Gesserit, heirs to Dune's powers, have colonized a green world and are turning it into a desert, mile by scorched mile. In this, the final book in the Dune Chronicles, Herbert again creates a world of breathtakingly evolved characters and the contexts in which to appreciate them. The richness of detail and perspective fascinates, while the multi-layered plot evolves as pages turn. Riveting from end to end, the legend lives on in the greatest science fiction epic of all time.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

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