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Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov
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Foundation and Earth (original 1986; edition 2004)

by Isaac Asimov

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6,07656976 (3.78)1 / 43
Member:webaugur
Title:Foundation and Earth
Authors:Isaac Asimov
Info:Spectra (2004), Mass Market Paperback, 528 pages
Collections:Home Library, Your library
Rating:
Tags:Science Fiction

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Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov (1986)

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English (46)  French (5)  Italian (3)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (55)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
This is my least favorite Foundation book despite focusing on one of my favorite Foundation themes (Earth as myth and the quest to find its reality). Bliss and Trevize, however, work my last ever-loving nerve. I find both of them equally obnoxious, and the constant bickering between them annoys me into eye-rolling. ( )
  Zoes_Human | Jul 22, 2018 |
I've been reading the Foundation books recently, starting with Foundation through Earth—NB: I haven't gotten to the prequels, yet, and after this one I'm not sure if I will—and this is the weakest of them so far. For Asimov fans, it's worth reading just to see where he wanted to end up, but it's frankly a weaker book than the others. Which can be forgiven. Asimov was getting old when he wrote this and had already suffered the heart attack and contracted the illness which ultimately led to his death. (Check Wikipedia for more details. It's a sad story.) I'll forgive a guy facing a terminal illness if he wants to take his story off the rails a bit in the 11th hour. That said, my chief complaints (two of them) are these:

1) Starting with the first book, Foundation, Asimov has kept these stories remarkably clean. Like "G" rated. He doesn't even use curse words. He'll make up expletives like “By galaxy!” or insults like “That son of two strangers!” instead of actual cursing. So I immediately assumed he was a little prudish. Nothing wrong with that. I was enjoying the books enough. The stories were solid and well thought out. But in this one, out of the blue, he has a couple of sex scenes. Not graphically drawn out, but more than hinted at. In fact, he goes on about the main character's "stamina" as if it were a source of pride. Furthermore, the fact that the main character was so good in bed becomes a key plot point and helps resolve a minor crisis. Oh Asimov... that's just disappointing. Sloppy writing aside, that's completely out of character from the previous 4 books.

2) For a book in the Foundation series, this one doesn't include the Foundation at all. It should probably have been called "Galaxia and Earth" but it wouldn't have fit the motif. Also, why take the denouement of the previous book, and then write an entirely new book around the main character whining about it when he was the person who decided the fate of the universe at the end of that last book? (I'm getting off topic here.) And why spend an entire novel with Bliss griping about Trevize's sexual exploits, almost as if she were jealous, and then never explain that? (Really off topic.)

Okay, perhaps I have more than a few complaints, but whatever. If you're a fan of the series, read on, just temper your expectations. ( )
  invisiblelizard | May 28, 2018 |
Starts out strong, then drags, then just rolls to a stop. This book could have been a good 100 pages shorter. Also, of course, nearly all of the characters talk like they are reading out of a textbook. Unfortunately, the one thing that keeps Asimov interesting, his ideas, fall apart in this novel. My least favorite of the Foundation series. ( )
  Sean_Murphy | Dec 23, 2017 |
Starts out strong, then drags, then just rolls to a stop. This book could have been a good 100 pages shorter. Also, of course, nearly all of the characters talk like they are reading out of a textbook. Unfortunately, the one thing that keeps Asimov interesting, his ideas, fall apart in this novel. My least favorite of the Foundation series. ( )
  Sean_Murphy | Dec 23, 2017 |
Summa finale dei cicli di Asimov,vengono ripresi riferimenti a tutti i suoi romanzi del ciclo dei robot,dell'impero e della fondazione.
Alcuni particolari della narrazione possono a volte apparire scontati.Si legge tutto d'un fiato e fa venire voglia di rileggere di nuovo tutti i romanzi per poter cogliere meglio dettagli ed informazioni che per ovvi motivi non erano disponibili durante la prima lettura. Avvincente. Fa sognare il futuro. Il primo pensiero che ho avuto appena finito di leggere stato: peccato che Asimov non ci sia più per poter continuare questa fantastica saga! ( )
  AlessandraEtFabio | Dec 22, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
Mr. Asimov has failed to integrate the necessary background into the current action in a way that can make sense to a new reader (as he did so deftly in ''Foundation's Edge'' and ''Robots and Empire''). Worse, he is too busy referring the reader to positions staked out in the earlier books to create fresh sources of dramatic tension. In his younger days, when he chronicled the decline and fall of the Galactic Empire through plots borrowed from Roman history, he tagged his narratives with playful quotations from the ''Encyclopedia Galactica.'' Now he seems to be treating his own corpus of work as the stuff of history. His characters are so conscious of their awesome responsibilities that they lack spontaneity. As eager as I am to know what Mr. Asimov has in store for the galaxy, I hope that he continues this project out of real conviction and not merely from habit or a sense of obligation. I would prefer a few loose ends to a series of backward-looking sequels.
 
Does the Foundation series really end here? Near the end of the novel, we are given a clue to what may be yet to come. An idiosyncrasy of Asimov's Foundation/Robot universe has always been that mankind has expanded into an empty and almost lifeless galaxy with no intelligent aliens, a galaxy where men and the robots are the only intelligent life forms. Now we receive a hint that there may be intelligent alien life in other galaxies and that mankind and these aliens may be destined to meet. Isaac Asimov is an amazingly prolific writer, and he has been well rewarded for his recent efforts. I would not want to bet that "Foundation and Earth" is really the conclusion of the Foundation series.
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionscalculated
Anselmi, PieroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiconi, OscarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dumont, StéphaneCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Markkula, PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wallerstein, AlanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
To the memory of Judy-Lynn Del Rey
(1943-1986), a giant in mind and spirit.
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'Why did I do it?' asked Golan Trevize.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
    FOUNDATION'S END?

Centuries after the fall of the First Galactic Empire, Mankind's destiny lay in the hands of Golan Trevize, former councilman of the First Foundation. Reluctantly he chose the mental unity of Galaxia as the only alternative to a future of unending chaos.

But Mankind as massmind was not an idea Trevize was comfortable with. So he journeyed in search of humanity's legendary home, fabled Earth, hoping there to find a solution to his dilemma.

Yet Earth  had been lost for thousands of years, and no one could say exactly where it was or if, indeed, it existed at all. More important, Treviz suspected he might not like the answers he found there.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553587579, Mass Market Paperback)

The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man's fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:00 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The fifth novel in Asimov''s popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man''s fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

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