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Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov
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Foundation and Earth (original 1986; edition 2004)

by Isaac Asimov

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5,10640876 (3.77)1 / 32
Member:joewmyrtle
Title:Foundation and Earth
Authors:Isaac Asimov
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Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Sci-Fi

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Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov (1986)

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English (32)  French (4)  Italian (3)  All languages (39)
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
In this book, dissatisfied with his decision, Trevise and Pelorat decide to continue their search through the varied worlds of the galaxy, this time joined by the Gaian Bliss. An encounter with an official on Comporallan leads to the party learing of the long forgotten Spacer worlds along with what claims to be the actual co-ordinates of three of these worlds. After a bit of jiggery pokery with his superb computer, Trevise manages to locate an area of space consistant with the Spacer worlds - systems not listed in the ship's maps taking us to the remnants of a Spacer world listed as Aurora in their ancient records but the planet is falling to pieces after being deserted by humanity. Solaria, their second stop, is in far better nick but is even more dangerous when they're located by the owner of the estate they had impinged on. Barely escaping from there with their lives they reach a third world denuded of much of it's atmosphere but home to an overly active form of moss where they find the co-ordinates of all the Spacer worlds which enables them to find the co-ordinates of Earth but there tehy find those tales of a radio-active planet are no exageration. On the large moon, they find the secret of why earth had been hidden and Trevise gets an answer as to why he made his choice.

In this book we meet R Daneel Olivaw from Asimov's earlier robot novels and I have to say that in this, he was pretty ineffective (though to be fair, he was senescing as well). ( )
  JohnFair | Aug 27, 2014 |
I have been listening to the Foundation series audiobooks, read by Larry A. McKeever, over the past few months. Considering the first Foundation novel was written in 1957 - and this particular one 1986 - I can't help but feel humility curling about my bones as I attempt to formulate a conducive analysis of this series, let alone this book.

Foundation and Earth is unique in the series as it continues the adventures of the characters from the previous book - all other Foundation novels span hundreds of years and rarely focus too long on any one particular character, let alone for the span of TWO books. So the three heroes journey onward searching for Earth. Got that. You never really understand WHY, not in the clearest sense, until the last chapter. And then you are left with a tantalizing cliffhanger in the form of a meaningful glance.

Asimov's prose is clear, succinct and dry. No fluff or excess, you read only what is necessary, not a hair more. Although I appreciate Asimov's brevity, there was much that I could have enjoyed in the form of character development, background, and explanation of action. If it weren't for the naive and selfless scientist Pellorat, the reader would be completely in the dark about much of the plot development. le sigh. I regret books and stories that abuse character thus.

Wish I could have given this book a solid five. I enjoyed the progression of the plot but the characters felt two dimensional and the 'point' of the whole adventure seemed obtuse. Three stars, sadness. (But I am gleefully journeying on in the Foundation series - on to McKeever and the sixth book!) ( )
  konrad.katie | Apr 24, 2014 |
The characters are tiresome. It's repetitive, and slow to get around to anything interesting that wasn't already in the previous book. It's four or five times longer than it has any reason to be. Even so, it's a fast read, and makes for a satisfying conclusion to the series. ( )
  comfypants | Dec 13, 2013 |
This book is set nearly 500 years after the start of the Foundation era, and continues the adventures of councilman Golan Trevize and his friend Janov Pelorat. Pelorat, having become smitten with Bliss, decides to accompany Golan once more on his quest for Earth. Golan now feels more compelled than ever to find Earth. He wants justification for his decision to convert the galaxy to Gaiism, or, Galaxia as Bliss calls it. The three of them have to visit world after world, getting out of tight spots and following the barest of breadcrumbs to unravel the mystery of the location of planet Earth. ( )
  IAmAndyPieters | Oct 30, 2013 |
The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man's fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.

### From Publishers Weekly

The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man's fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia. Springing from the same impulse that has fed his myriad nonfiction work, the novel's debate is enlivened by Asimov's fervid curiosity and his restless urge to explain everything, right down to the human passions that have largely vanished from his fiction. In fact, the characters, the tie-ins to Asimov's Robot series and the search's revelations suffer from the impersonal neatness that has handicapped Asimov's other fiction. He has, however, found an ingenious way around his clumsiness with novelistic narrative by employing a formal fairy tale structure in which the different worlds represent tasks or gifts or wishes, their fair aspect hiding a deadly surprise. As a result, this rather lightweight addendum to the series breathes in a way his heavier, more substantial books seldom do. Paperback rights to Ballantine/Del Rey; BOMC alternate.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

### From the Inside Flap

The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man's fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia. ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Hans.Michel | Sep 13, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Mr. Asimov has failed to integrate the necessary background into the current action in a way that can make sense to a new reader (as he did so deftly in ''Foundation's Edge'' and ''Robots and Empire''). Worse, he is too busy referring the reader to positions staked out in the earlier books to create fresh sources of dramatic tension. In his younger days, when he chronicled the decline and fall of the Galactic Empire through plots borrowed from Roman history, he tagged his narratives with playful quotations from the ''Encyclopedia Galactica.'' Now he seems to be treating his own corpus of work as the stuff of history. His characters are so conscious of their awesome responsibilities that they lack spontaneity. As eager as I am to know what Mr. Asimov has in store for the galaxy, I hope that he continues this project out of real conviction and not merely from habit or a sense of obligation. I would prefer a few loose ends to a series of backward-looking sequels.
 
Does the Foundation series really end here? Near the end of the novel, we are given a clue to what may be yet to come. An idiosyncrasy of Asimov's Foundation/Robot universe has always been that mankind has expanded into an empty and almost lifeless galaxy with no intelligent aliens, a galaxy where men and the robots are the only intelligent life forms. Now we receive a hint that there may be intelligent alien life in other galaxies and that mankind and these aliens may be destined to meet. Isaac Asimov is an amazingly prolific writer, and he has been well rewarded for his recent efforts. I would not want to bet that "Foundation and Earth" is really the conclusion of the Foundation series.
 

» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Anselmi, PieroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiconi, OscarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dumont, StéphaneCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Markkula, PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wallerstein, AlanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
TO THE MEMORY OF
JUDY-LYNN DEL REY
(1943-1986)
A GIANT IN MIND AND SPIRIT.
First words
'Why did I do it?' asked Golan Trevize.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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    FOUNDATION'S END?

Centuries after the fall of the First Galactic Empire, Mankind's destiny lay in the hands of Golan Trevize, former councilman of the First Foundation. Reluctantly he chose the mental unity of Galaxia as the only alternative to a future of unending chaos.

But Mankind as massmind was not an idea Trevize was comfortable with. So he journeyed in search of humanity's legendary home, fabled Earth, hoping there to find a solution to his dilemma.

Yet Earth  had been lost for thousands of years, and no one could say exactly where it was or if, indeed, it existed at all. More important, Treviz suspected he might not like the answers he found there.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553587579, Mass Market Paperback)

The fifth novel in Asimov's popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man's fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:32:03 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The fifth novel in Asimov''s popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man''s fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

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