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Justice as Fairness: A Restatement by John…
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Justice as Fairness: A Restatement (edition 2001)

by John Bordley Rawls (Author), Erin Kelly (Editor)

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364429,815 (3.85)3
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Title:Justice as Fairness: A Restatement
Authors:John Bordley Rawls (Author)
Other authors:Erin Kelly (Editor)
Info:Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2001.
Collections:Your library, Wikler, Wikler Office, Wikler Office - North Bookshelf, Boston Area Authorship, Contractrianism, Ethical Theory, Philosopher, Rawlsianism, Social Contract, Social Philosophy, Harvard
Rating:*****
Tags:Wikler, Wikler 208, Wikler Office, Wikler Office - North Bookshelf, ethical theory, ethics, Rawls, Social contract theory, original position, 2001

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Justice as Fairness: A Restatement by John Rawls

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Published only one year before his death, this is the best possible restatement of the Rawls positions on an array of social contract theory notions, including original position. ( )
  vegetarian | Dec 11, 2012 |
need to take time to go through this reading. It can get boring quickly. ( )
  Nikkisaac | Jan 26, 2011 |
Rawls' elegant argument has become a staple of liberal politics:
(a) Each person has the same indefeasible right/claim to a fully adequate scheme of basic liberties, which scheme is compatible with the same scheme of liberties for all (liberty principle); and
(b) Social and economic inequalities are to satisfy two conditions: first, they are to be attached to offices and positions open to all under conditions of fair equality of opportunity (the equality principle); and second, they are to be to the greatest benefit of the least-advantaged members of society (the difference principle).

In order to understand the direction of American social and political discourse, one must come to terms with what he argues. He schooled pretty much all of the up and coming politicians while at Harvard, including POTUS.

I do not agree with his argument, as it is a sail without wind (unless of course political coercion is employed). Nonetheless, his arguments underly our national discussion at the moment. Even the conservatives have grabbed on to his ideas and are shouting for egalitarian rule— despite the democratic elections. ( )
  chriszodrow | Aug 18, 2009 |
the meat of rawls. start here if you get intimidated by his theory of justice. ( )
  heidilove | Dec 8, 2005 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Rawlsprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kelly, ErinEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0674005112, Paperback)

Few philosophers have made as much of a splash with a single book as John Rawls did with the 1971 publication of A Theory of Justice. Thirty years later, Justice as Fairness rearticulates the main themes of his earlier work and defends it against the swarm of criticisms it has attracted. Throughout the book, Rawls continues to defend his well-known thought experiment in which an "original position"--a sort of prenatal perspective ignorant of our race, class, and gender--provides the basis for formulating ethical principles that result in a harmonious liberal state. In addition, he supplies carefully worked-out responses and, in some cases, reformulations of his theory. Those coming to Rawls for the first time will find a lucid portrayal of his position; those embroiled in the ongoing debate will encounter a closely argued and subtle rejoinder to his adversaries. Readers will be pleased that the daunting volumes of Rawls's previous work have been distilled to a digestible 214 pages. --Eric de Place

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:32:48 -0400)

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