HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller by…
Loading...

Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller

by Georgina Kleege

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
185561,019 (4.38)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 5 of 5
Daring format, interesting topic and thoughtful reflections. If you are looking for a biography, then no, this isn't it. This is Kleege's reading of all those other Hellen Keller books, her response to them, the ways in which she fills the gaps left by provable history and facts and comments on Keller's disability from the perspective of her own modern blind experience.

Kleege is really interested in Keller's romantic life, I'm not convinced it is entirely because officially Keller is so asexualized as part of the process of turning her into a saint but that is a decent reason. Although asexuality is real, can you think of a less likely candidate than someone for whom touch is a primary sense? Not to mention that while real, it is also quite rare and being deaf-blind is already a rarity indeed. Kleege's speculations were interesting, then she won me over by suggesting than Keller and Teacher (AKA Anne Sullivan) might have had a romantic relationship (a Boston marriage) and Teacher's own marriage to Macy might have been a cover up for that (or a threeway relationship!). Basically I'm about to start writing them fanfic now, since this feels quite like meta.

Many seem to find the second person narratative tedious, I love it. It's intimate and different, makes you think of the words. It also perfect for the game of 'what ifs' that this book ultimately is (it's reliance on actual facts is not the best, afaik, but that is also not the point).

I really liked the analysis of language (how dare a blind person speak of colours?) and Keller's explanation that no language existed to describe the variety of input she got through touch/smell/taste in the English language, and, if it did, it would not be understood by Normals. As well as the general criticism of abled-bodied people of the supposed capacities of those who lack one or more sense (the author gets corrected when she writes 'I was reading a book' instead of 'I was listening to a book'), I have considered whether it is accurate to use 'read' to refer to audiobooks and concluded that it is (it's actually *harder* for me to listen, tbh).

I really enjoyed this and you should know Hellen Keller's own books are available at Guttenberg Project for free. "The World I Live In" looks great!
( )
  askajnaiman | Jun 14, 2016 |
Daring format, interesting topic and thoughtful reflections. If you are looking for a biography, then no, this isn't it. This is Kleege's reading of all those other Hellen Keller books, her response to them, the ways in which she fills the gaps left by provable history and facts and comments on Keller's disability from the perspective of her own modern blind experience.

Kleege is really interested in Keller's romantic life, I'm not convinced it is entirely because officially Keller is so asexualized as part of the process of turning her into a saint but that is a decent reason. Although asexuality is real, can you think of a less likely candidate than someone for whom touch is a primary sense? Not to mention that while real, it is also quite rare and being deaf-blind is already a rarity indeed. Kleege's speculations were interesting, then she won me over by suggesting than Keller and Teacher (AKA Anne Sullivan) might have had a romantic relationship (a Boston marriage) and Teacher's own marriage to Macy might have been a cover up for that (or a threeway relationship!). Basically I'm about to start writing them fanfic now, since this feels quite like meta.

Many seem to find the second person narratative tedious, I love it. It's intimate and different, makes you think of the words. It also perfect for the game of 'what ifs' that this book ultimately is (it's reliance on actual facts is not the best, afaik, but that is also not the point).

I really liked the analysis of language (how dare a blind person speak of colours?) and Keller's explanation that no language existed to describe the variety of input she got through touch/smell/taste in the English language, and, if it did, it would not be understood by Normals. As well as the general criticism of abled-bodied people of the supposed capacities of those who lack one or more sense (the author gets corrected when she writes 'I was reading a book' instead of 'I was listening to a book'), I have considered whether it is accurate to use 'read' to refer to audiobooks and concluded that it is (it's actually *harder* for me to listen, tbh).

I really enjoyed this and you should know Hellen Keller's own books are available at Guttenberg Project for free. "The World I Live In" looks great!
( )
  Evalangui | Aug 22, 2014 |
As a child, when I first read THE MIRACLE WORKER, I thought Anne Sullivan (Teacher) was a saint who had "saved" Helen Keller (another saint). To be honest, I hadn't questioned that feeling for the simple reason that I was not challenged to question it. BLIND RAGE caused me to put my childlike thinking aside and realize that Teacher and Helen were two human beings with disappointments and flaws and worries just like the rest of us. Through the use of creative nonfiction, Kleege uses her interpretation of events in Helen Keller's life to give the readers "What if?" moments. BLIND RAGE takes us away from the Hollywood version of Helen Keller's life and helps us to see how it really could have all happened.

From a teaching standpoint, students could first surmise their own "what ifs" regarding Helen Keller's life. This would introduce them to the genre they are going to be exposed to--creative nonfiction. Another assignment could mimic the style of the book. Since the author writes letters to Helen Keller, students' journal entries and book assessments could be written in letter format. Time permitting, these letters could be used in another activity in which students swap letters and respond from Helen's viewpoint.
  TheVeaz | Jul 4, 2012 |
Not a big Helen Keller fan? I wasn't either, but believe me, this book is amazing. Not because it's a big Keller slam (which it isn't), but because it directly addresses many of the reasons why modern blind people have avoided her like the plague. At the same time, it tells Helen's story (do you mind if I call her Helen?) in a totally engaging style and with healthy chunks of fantasy and libelous speculation thrown in for good measure. I found it so compelling that I immediately followed it with Helen's autobiography which I've avoided for years, titled "The Story of my Life," written when the little brat was only 21 and only a quarter of the way through the actual life being chronicled. If you're anything like me, you've been dodging Helen for years (except for sleeping through a showing of "the Miracle Worker," in fifth grade). I've had such antipathy towards her, but Kleege tells her story in such an insidious way that I am forced to admit to admiration, respect, and even a little pity for poor Helen who seems never to have been given a moment’s peace. Not so grudging is my enormous appreciation for Kleege's skill as a writer, and her insight into this enormously significant blind eyecon. Kleege takes back Keller, peals off the layers of AFB paint, and reveals her to a modern blind (and sighted) readership as the incredibly capable and flexible woman she was. I’m sorry, Helen. I had gravely misjudged you.
  Polyphemus | Feb 29, 2008 |
http://thegimpparade.blogspot.co...

Excerpt of my review: Kleege's approach in questioning Keller's life is a distinctly feminist one. An awareness of "the gaze" exists throughout the book, and though it is primarily a nondisabled gaze upon the body and actions of a blind-deaf woman, as a disabled woman myself I find this inextricably intertwined with the familiar male gaze of feminist theory and critique. (And Michel Foucault's medical gaze, as well.) After all, the nondisabled gaze upon Keller would have been quite different were she a deaf-blind boy and man instead of a girl and woman. Ability and gender are inseparable in the complex personal interactions of disabled women within a society that privileges both male and able-bodiedness. ( )
  thegimpparade | Dec 12, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.38)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 2
4.5 1
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,060,685 books! | Top bar: Always visible