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Tituba by William Miller
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Unlike most biographies, the author's note is before the story starts. While it is author's preference, I feel that it distracts from the story. This biography is obviously more creative with its retelling of Tituba's life, however, I feel it is appealing to students. ( )
  rparks | Nov 9, 2016 |
Tituba is one of the only African American women talked about in relation with the Salem Witch Trials. Tituba was a slave taken from her homeland by her master and brought to Boston. Later they moved to a small village called Salem. She was responsible for her master's daughter and niece. As they grew older, they would inquire about Tituba's homeland and what it was like. She would tell them all about what it was like back home. After the stories, the girls were changing and being "taunted by the devil and evil spirits." Tituba was the first women they went after, she finally admitted to being a witch (although she just had different beliefs) and was thrown in prison. This book is about her life and what happened after she was sold by her master. Although we are not actually sure what did or did not happen after, I think this book is a great outlook on the situation. I think that this book is definitely for older children and younger teenagers. The Salem Witch Trials are harsh and many young children do not fully understand. ( )
  mlanford3 | Jan 20, 2016 |
No bibliography and mostly supposition. ( )
  cabaty | Sep 28, 2015 |
I liked this book because it addresses the only person of color to be accused in the Salem witch trials. That said, she was not nearly as passive as this book would make her out to be, not only confessing, but accusing other women in turn. I'm not sure, that this is necessarily a book for the suggested age groups. The Salem witch trials were a dark period in our history. I would probably consider it for older, struggling readers.
Reading Level: 3.3 Interest Level: K-3 ( )
  TaraKennedy | Feb 23, 2015 |
This book speaks of the Salem Witch trials through the life story of Tituba, the slave who was brought to Boston and then wrongfully accused. It teaches how many women were forced to assay they were witches in order to survive, and even then they still might be put to death. It was a good book with matching illustrations. I would recommend it to grades 1-5. ( )
  Trock33 | Oct 2, 2014 |
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Book description
In the winter of 1692, trouble erupted in Salem Village. The fits and dreams of two young girls set off a witch-hunt. More than eighty villagers found themselves charged with witchcraft; twenty-five lost their lives.
At the center of the storm stood Tituba, a West Indian slave who was among the first accused. This is the story of her struggle and the profound questions she confronted: Was her folk wisdom really witchcraft? Would she have to offer a false confession to save her life? And where, amid so much anger and turmoil, could she turn for hope and strength?
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0152018972, Hardcover)

In the winter of 1692, trouble erupted in Salem Village. The fits and dreams of two young girls set off a witch-hunt. More than eighty villagers found themselves charged with witchcraft; twenty-five lost their lives.
At the center of the storm stood Tituba, a West Indian slave who was among the first accused. This is the story of her struggle and the profound questions she confronted: Was her folk wisdom really witchcraft? Would she have to offer a false confession to save her life? And where, amid so much anger and turmoil, could she turn for hope and strength?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:10 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Story of Tituba, a West Indian slave who was unjustly accused of witchcraft at the outset of the Salem, Massachusetts, witch trials.

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