HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the…
Loading...

Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious (2002)

by Timothy D. Wilson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
273841,545 (3.85)3
Recently added byAntonioGallo, private library, sasgari, ikka123, ltimmel, robertlurie, MelissaZD, eskie32, rosemadder
Legacy LibrariesDavid Foster Wallace
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

English (7)  Dutch (1)  All languages (8)
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
There is a price to pay in self-knowledge. There is a great deal about ourselves that we cannot know directly, even with the most painstaking introspection.
  AntonioGallo | Jun 8, 2014 |
Interesting look at the ways we can misperceive ourselves—our beliefs, our traits, our dependence on external conditions. Though there’s nothing particularly new here if you read a lot of behavioral psych, Wilson looks at behavioral issues from the perspective of a theoretician interested in whether there really is an unconscious mind and what’s in it. He covers unconscious racial prejudice, mistakes about our own competence, mistakes about how we actually feel about someone else, and so on. In the end, he suggests, coherent narratives are good for us (though they do need some connection to reality), and we can often improve our own lives by acting like the people we want to be—faking friendliness, or dutifulness, or other positive behaviors until we make it, in part by changing our own unconscious self-images. ( )
  rivkat | Aug 24, 2011 |
Excellent book by a very influential psychologist. I'm finding this in the bibliography of more and more books that I like.
Malcolm Gladwell recommends this book highly. I recommend you read this book instead of Gladwell's Blink, since Gladwell seems to ignore much of what Wilson actually has to say. Better companion reads would be Daniel Gilbert, Dan Ariely, or Jonah Lehrer. ( )
  dsmccoy | May 24, 2009 |
154.2 W753 Mlk
  Spudbunny | Oct 5, 2007 |
Very textbook like, too clinical, not the self help book I was hoping for. It’s about the adaptive unconscious and trying to recognize it and changing it. ( )
  rayski | Feb 19, 2007 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
It might seem that self-knowledge is a central topic on psychology.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (6)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674013824, Paperback)

"Know thyself," a precept as old as Socrates, is still good advice. But is introspection the best path to self-knowledge? What are we trying to discover, anyway? In an eye-opening tour of the unconscious, as contemporary psychological science has redefined it, Timothy D. Wilson introduces us to a hidden mental world of judgments, feelings, and motives that introspection may never show us.

This is not your psychoanalyst's unconscious. The adaptive unconscious that empirical psychology has revealed, and that Wilson describes, is much more than a repository of primitive drives and conflict-ridden memories. It is a set of pervasive, sophisticated mental processes that size up our worlds, set goals, and initiate action, all while we are consciously thinking about something else.

If we don't know ourselves--our potentials, feelings, or motives--it is most often, Wilson tells us, because we have developed a plausible story about ourselves that is out of touch with our adaptive unconscious. Citing evidence that too much introspection can actually do damage, Wilson makes the case for better ways of discovering our unconscious selves. If you want to know who you are or what you feel or what you're like, Wilson advises, pay attention to what you actually do and what other people think about you. Showing us an unconscious more powerful than Freud's, and even more pervasive in our daily life, Strangers to Ourselves marks a revolution in how we know ourselves.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:53 -0400)

""Know thyself," a precept as old as Socrates, is still good advice. But is introspection the best path to self-knowledge? What are we trying to discover, anyway? In an eye-opening tour of the unconscious, as contemporary psychological science has redefined it, Timothy D. Wilson introduces us to a hidden mental world of judgments, feelings, and motives that introspection may never show us."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
64 wanted3 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.85)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 11
3.5 5
4 14
4.5 4
5 7

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,108,561 books! | Top bar: Always visible