HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble…
Loading...

A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics) (original 1859; edition 2004)

by Charles Dickens, Gillen D'Arcy Wood (Introduction)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
21,59726861 (3.94)4 / 788
Member:fuzzi
Title:A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics)
Authors:Charles Dickens
Other authors:Gillen D'Arcy Wood (Introduction)
Info:Barnes & Noble Classics (2004), Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library, To read, TBR-owned but unread, ROOT 2015 - To Read, TBSL, E-book, ROOT 2014 - To Read
Rating:
Tags:Ebook

Work details

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (1859)

  1. 160
    Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (krizia_lazaro)
  2. 100
    The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy (MarcusBrutus)
  3. 40
    Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini (morryb)
    morryb: The French Revolutionary Mob becomes a character in each novel.
  4. 41
    The French Revolution: A History by Thomas Carlyle (chrisharpe)
    chrisharpe: A main source of inspiration for Dickens in writing A Tale of Two Cities.
Unread books (1,070)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (255)  Spanish (6)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (266)
Showing 1-5 of 255 (next | show all)
"The novel ranks among the most famous works in the history of fictional literature. It depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same time period. It follows the lives of several protagonists through these events." ( )
  | Jun 29, 2015 | edit |
Dunno why this is listed as a Most Difficult book on the g-r list. Just a lot of Victorian digressions to get through, but that can't be why. ( )
  ted_newell | Jun 20, 2015 |
Another great book by Dickens. I haven't read a Charles Dickens book since high school, and I felt that it was time to get back into it. After reading a couple easier books, I wanted a challenge. So this is what I picked.

It definitely wasn't an easy read. Took me a couple weeks to get through. But I especially loved the themes presented in the book. The love triangle, for instance, between Lucie, Charles Darnay, and Sidney Carton, is quite heartwrenching at times. The idea of loving someone and doing anything for them, even sacrificing your own life, is a timeless theme that is constantly expressed in many current pieces of literature.

And of course, just like the title implies, the story is about a tale of two cities. Not just literally, but if you look at it from a caste system point of view, Dickens does splendid work in expressing this. Or, if you prefer to focus on the characters themselves, then you can find that in them as well. Everyone has their good and their bad sides, and each character must figure out themselves before they can be of any use to others. This battle within the character is illustrated throughout the text.

Overall, I really liked the book. Kinda slow in the beginning, but got really exciting by the third book. Sparknotes also helped me a lot in the analysis of the story, so at least that's always available for those that want a classroom translation of the text. ( )
  jms001 | Jun 14, 2015 |
I thought it was about time I read a classic.
I loved the opening passage "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness ..."
At the end it was just as good a page turner as modern novels.
An eye opener, I was astounded at the brutality of the revolution, the inhumanity of the revolutionaries. I presume quite historically accurate.
Good portrayal of characters and subtle revelation of relationships.
( )
  GeoffSC | May 31, 2015 |
The first Dickens book I've read in a long time, aside from my in-depth, tear-apart-and-lose-all-enjoyment-therefore-culminating-in-another-go-in-many-years read of Hard Times for University, and I was excited to read it, purely because, having seen the ITV adaptation on telly a while ago, I could re-enact the Sydney Carton senarios using the face of the delectable Dirk Bogarde. (FYI Dirk Bogarde versus Richard Attenborough in a black-and-white bout of fisticuffs would only cause me to faint like a Eighteenth Century dandy witnessing the revealing of a piano's ankles.)

Though set in the late-Eighteenth Century surrounding the Reign of Terror that was the French Revolution, Dickens has still encapsulated everything that matters to those less fortunate than others (in this scenario it's French peasants). There is an interesting love triangle, though not at the forefront of the plot to begin with, makes it mark toward the end, with a scoop of suitors to boot, along with a collective of amusing old men and fiesty women. Very Dickens. ( )
  Xleptodactylous | Apr 7, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 255 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (73 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles Dickensprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ben Sussan, ReneIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Browne, Hablot KnightIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Busch, FrederickIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Busoni, RafaelloIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davidson, FrederickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haaren, Hans vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jarvis, MartinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keeping, CharlesIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Koch, StephenAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindo, Mark PragerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maxwell, RichardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nord, JulieEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
PhizIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pitt, David G.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prebble, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sanders, AndrewEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schirner, BuckNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shuckburgh, Sir JohnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vries, Theun deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, A.N.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winterich, John T.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Woodcock, GeorgeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Is retold in

Has the adaptation

Has as a reference guide/companion

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This tale is inscribed to the Lord John Russell in remembrance of many public services and private kindnesses
First words
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Quotations
It is a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.
I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the main work for A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. Please do not combine with any adaptation, abridgement, etc.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Relates the adventures of a young Englishman who gives his life during the French Revolution to save the husband of the woman he loves.
Haiku summary
Two men look alike. / They love the same good woman. / They’re all in danger. (marcusbrutus)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0141439602, Paperback)

After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille the aging Dr Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette. From the tranquil lanes of London, they are all drawn against their will to the vengeful, bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror and soon fall under the lethal shadow of La Guillotine.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:07 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille, the aging Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There the lives of two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Manette. From the tranquil roads of London, they are drawn against their will to the vengeful, bloodstained streets of Paris at the height of the Reign of Terror, and they soon fall under the lethal shadow of La Guillotine. This edition uses the text as it appeared in its first serial publication in 1859 to convey the full scope of Dickens's vision, and includes the original illustrations by H.K. Browne ('Phiz'). Richard Maxwell's introduction discusses the intricate interweaving of epic drama with personal tragedy.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 66 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5 6
1 87
1.5 19
2 283
2.5 51
3 754
3.5 153
4 1513
4.5 179
5 1439

Audible.com

42 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

5 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141439602, 0141031743, 0141325542, 0141196904, 0141199709

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Urban Romantics

An edition of this book was published by Urban Romantics.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 97,853,246 books! | Top bar: Always visible