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The Shape of Time: Remarks on the History of…
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The Shape of Time: Remarks on the History of Things

by George Kubler

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This is a great book for those who want a system of thinking about sequences of things. It makes a complex topic digestable. I have been using it to develop a four dimension map stack for portraying the movement of culture and idea across geography and up through time. The map has become a transparent stack that looks for all the world like amorous lava lamp globules changing shape as they interact and continue up through history and geography. Kubler offers a grammar of the changes objects go through in their shift from one culture to another, from one era to the next, from one site to another where the object takes on the influences of a whole new milleaux. Good stuff. Look at Titiana Prosskoriakoffs works on Mayan iconography for a great start on animating artifacts and other objects as they are adapted through time and across geography. Jim
1 vote jimfelton9 | Jan 23, 2007 |
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Let us suppose that the idea of art can be expanded to embrace the whole range of man-made things, including all tools and writing in addition to the useless, beautiful, and poetic things of the world.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0300001444, Paperback)

When it was first released in 1962, The Shape of Time presented a radically new approach to the study of art history. Drawing upon new insights in fields such as anthropology and linguistics, George Kubler replaced the notion of style as the basis for histories of art with the concept of historical sequence and continuous change across time. Kubler’s classic work is now made available in a freshly designed edition.

 

The Shape of Time is as relevant now as it was in 1962. This book, a sober, deeply introspective, and quietly thrilling meditation on the flow of time and space and the place of objects within a larger continuum, adumbrates so many of the critical and theoretical concerns of the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. It is both appropriate and necessary that it re-appear in our consciousness at this time.”—Edward J. Sullivan, New York University

 

This book will be of interest to all students of art history and to those concerned with the nature and theory of history in general. In a study of formal and symbolic durations the author presents a radically new approach to the problem of historical change. Using new ideas in anthropology and linguistics, he pursues such questions as the nature of time, the nature of change, and the meaning of invention. The result is a view of historical sequence aligned on continuous change more than upon the static notion of style—the usual basis for conventional histories of art.
 
"A carefully reasoned and brilliantly suggestive essay in defense of the view that the history of art can be the study of formal relationships, as against the view that it should concentrate on ideas of symbols or biography."—Harper's.
"It is a most important achievement, and I am sure that it will be studies for many years in many fields. I hope the book upsets people and makes them reformulate."—James Ackerman.
"In this brief and important essay, George Kubler questions the soundness of the stylistic basis of art historical studies. . . . The Shape of Time ably states a significant position on one of the most complex questions of modern art historical scholarship."—Virginia Quarterly Review.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:16 -0400)

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Yale University Press

2 editions of this book were published by Yale University Press.

Editions: 0300001444, 0300100612

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