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The Working Life: The Promise and Betrayal…
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The Working Life: The Promise and Betrayal of Modern Work

by Joanne B. Ciulla

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This is one of the most realistic books on the nature of work ever written. Ciulla is willing to admit that people for pay, not purely as an life-fulfilling avocation. I think that the latter myth, including the glorification of managers, is extremely damaging to the average worker. Ciulla points out the life, the cheats, the betrayals. ( )
  juglicerr | Aug 14, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0812929012, Hardcover)

Work, for most of us, is something we do, not something we think about. We may wonder whether our work is sufficiently stimulating, whether it brings in enough money, or whether it makes a difference in the grand scheme of things, but we don't often question what, in fact, work really is, and why we work in the first place. In The Working Life, Joanne Ciulla asks these critical questions and others, taking a philosophical, sociological, and practical look at the nature of work and its role in our lives today.

As Ciulla points out, we live in a work-oriented society where, even though we have more freedom and flexibility than ever and more tools to increase convenience and efficiency, our work determines our lives. We have "gone beyond the work ethic," she states, to a point where our jobs have become our primary source of identity. To understand this, Ciulla looks at the values we reflect in our choice of jobs and professions, the attitudes we express in our language for work, and the sociohistorical journey that work has taken from cursed necessity to calling. She follows the path of work in our recent past, from unregulated labor and slavery, through unionism, to the rise of the all-encompassing corporation and today's blurred lines between private and public lives. In the final section, Ciulla investigates the role that work plays in our understanding and use of time and our search for meaning.

Now teaching courses on ethics, leadership, and critical thinking at Virginia's University of Richmond, Ciulla has examined and experienced the nature of work from both sides of the managerial divide. After supporting herself through the first nine years of an academic career with bar and restaurant work, she went on to study and teach business ethics at Harvard and Wharton. These varied experiences give the book a balanced and sensitive tone, adding credibility to her insights. She supports and refines her ideas about work with the comments of philosophers, writers, sociologists, economists, management theorists, and even the narratives of popular television shows. Her sources range from Aristotle and the ancient storyteller Aesop to the early-20th-century time-study engineer Frederick Winslow Taylor, the comic strip "Dilbert," and modern-day business gurus. The diversity of perspectives is inspiring and helps--together with Ciulla's own interpretations and clear, precise prose--create a thought-provoking and stimulating look at the nature of work. --S. Ketchum

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:48:27 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Joanne Ciulla invites us to explore the historical and cultural presuppositions about employment. She says that the greatest challenge today is not work, but how to make our lives work. She traces work from "curse to calling - and beyond" by drawing on history, mythology (ancient and contemporary), pop culture, management theory, and practical experience."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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