HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Vinyl leaves : Walt Disney World and America…
Loading...

Vinyl leaves : Walt Disney World and America (1992)

by Stephen M Fjellman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
713168,809 (3.69)1
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 3 of 3
While at times I got lost in the philosophical discussions of postmodernism and semiotics I found this book to be quite fascinating in its dissection of Walt Disney World. Many fond childhood memories take place in WDW, and I currently struggle with nostalgic idealization of WDW intermingled with a contempt for the capitalist system that it upholds. Fjellman does a great job of discussing this struggle, as he also feels the pull of WDW while simultaneously being repulsed by it.

It was great reading about the old rides that I used to love and have since been torn apart into crappy thrill rides, and also funny to hear about the new technology of laser discs, but I would love to read an updated perspective of the park. Fjellman seems to have a bit of contempt for EPCOT Center (my favorite of the parks at Disney). The EPCOT in this book would be completely unrecognizable to anybody who has been within the last 10 years without having gone in the early or mid 1990s. The corporate sponsorship remains, and the underlying corporate messages are still intact, but I wonder how Fjellman would react to the moving away from "educational" rides to thrill rides.

Ironically, this book makes me want to go back to WDW, and look at the park through fresh eyes. ( )
  lemontwist | Apr 4, 2010 |
Most "scholarly" books and articles about Walt Disney World come off
as elitist and condescending. This is the first book that I've read that takes
an intellectual and honest stance about what's going on at Walt Disney World
from a cultural, sociological and anthropological point of view. The author is a perceptive observer, but also an unabashed admirer of Walt Disney World. The result is a whirlwind, very detailed tour through the WDW of the late 80's, offset by perceptive and highly referenced cultural musings.

The author does not shy away from the controversy, the incongruities, and the outright pastiche of the place, while at the same time, enjoying every minute of it.

Also interesting for its detailed description of several attractions that no longer exist, such as the original Communicore in EPCOT and Horizons. ( )
1 vote Atomicmutant | Oct 5, 2009 |
As posted to Sirsi's catalog: "Fellman analyzes each ride and theater show of Walt Disney world and discusses the history, political economy, technical infrastructure, and urban planning of the area as well as its relationship with metropolitan Orlando and the state of Florida. He argues that Disney, in pursuit of its own economic interests, acts as the muse for the allied transnational corporations that sponsor it as well as for the world of late capitalism, where the commodity form has colonized much of human life." ( )
  billlund | Apr 8, 2006 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"It's a very funny thing," said Bear, "but there seem to be two animals now. This - whatever-it-was - has been joined by another - whatever-it-is - and the two of them are now proceeding in company. Would you mind coming with me, Piglet, in case they turn out to be Hostile Animals?"
- Winnie-the-Pooh
George Washington may be the father of this country, Dad, but Walt Disney is its guardian.
- Dick Schaap's son
When economic necessity is replaced by the necessity for boundless economic development, the satisfaction of primary human needs is replaced by an uninterrupted fabrication of pseudo-needs which are reduced to the single pseudo-need of maintaining the reign of the autonomous economy.
- Guy Debord
It is possible that Walt Disney has taught more people history, in a more memorable way, than they ever learned in school.
- Mike Wallace
Corporate desire to fudge the past combined with Disney's ability to spruce it up promotes a sense of history as a pleasantly nostalgic memory, now so completely transcended by the modern corporate order as to be completely irrelevant to contemporary life.
- Mike Wallace
Dedication
To Melina
First words
There is a tree in central Florida.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0813314720, Paperback)

Walt Disney World is a pilgrimage site filled with utopian elements, craft, and whimsy. It’s a pedestrian’s world, where the streets are clean, the employees are friendly, and the trains run on time. All of its elements are themed, presented in a consistent architectural, decorative, horticultural, musical, even olfactory tone, with rides, shows, restaurants, scenery, and costumed characters coordinated to tell a consistent set of stories. It is beguiling and exasperating, a place of ambivalence and ambiguity. In Vinyl Leaves Professor Fjellman analyzes each ride and theater show of Walt Disney World and discusses the history, political economy, technical infrastructure, and urban planning of the area as well as its relationship with Metropolitan Orlando and the state of Florida.Vinyl Leaves argues that Disney, in pursuit of its own economic interests, acts as the muse for the allied transnational corporations that sponsor it as well as for the world of late capitalism, where the commodity form has colonized much of human life. With brilliant technological legerdemain, Disney puts visitors into cinematically structured stories in which pieces of American and world culture become ideological tokens in arguments in favor of commodification and techno-corporate control. Culture is construed as spirit, colonialism and entrepreneurial violence as exotic zaniness, and the Other as child.Exhaustion and cognitive overload lead visitors into the bliss of Commodity Zen—the characteristic state of postmodern life. While we were watching for Orwell, Huxley rode into town, bringing soma, cable, and charge cards—and wearing mouse ears. This book is the story of our commodity fairyland.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:08 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.69)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 1
3.5
4 3
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,430,608 books! | Top bar: Always visible