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One-Eye! Two-Eyes! Three-Eyes!: A Very Grimm…
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One-Eye! Two-Eyes! Three-Eyes!: A Very Grimm Fairy Tale

by Aaron Shepard

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Showing 5 of 5
I liked it. It was sort of gross in an eye-sense, but I guess it also taught us a lesson on accepting differences or the so-called. ( )
  lmeza | Feb 6, 2014 |
This book is a fun and different spin off of Cinderella that both genders will enjoy about a young lady who is "different" because she has two eyes when everyone else has only one or three. This is a fun book for the entire class to read together and then come up with their own fairy tales. This book is suitable for ages 4-8.
  Kitrina | Oct 17, 2013 |
I really enjoyed this short read. I feel like it is very appropriate for elementary aged students. It brought such a silver lining on for "two eyes." I believe this story had the meaning of hope. That if you go do what you want to everyday something good will come from it. I would totally recommend this fairy tale to all elementary teachers.
  SamiRomanecz | Sep 18, 2013 |
Little One Eye, Two Eyes, and Three Eyes was always one of my favorite fairy tales when I was growing up, so seeing it in its own picture book was just heaven to me.

And this version lives up to the one I grew up with, too.

Little Two-Eyes is despised by her sisters for being "different" (in the version I grew up with, it was for being normal, which makes more sense, but being "different" makes for a funnier punch line in the end) by having two eyes instead of one or three like they do. (Weirdly, they're shown watching TV with odd-eyed people.)

So they treat her like the classic red-headed stepchild - leftovers and rags - until she cries and cries. You can work out the gist of the end now, I'm sure :)

Very funny, and neat illustrations. ( )
  conuly | Sep 4, 2009 |
great illustrations ( )
  bookokie | Apr 9, 2009 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0689867409, Hardcover)

 
TEACHERS AND LIBRARIANS -- A READER'S THEATER SCRIPT OF THIS BOOK IS AVAILABLE FREE ON AARON'S WEB SITE.
 
PLEASE CLICK "SHOW MORE," BELOW, TO SEE HONORS, REVIEWS, SAMPLE TEXT, AND AUTHOR AND ILLUSTRATOR INFO.
 
Once there were three sisters who lived together in a cottage in the woods. The oldest sister was no different from other people. She had just one eye, right in the middle of her forehead. The middle sister was also quite ordinary. She had one eye on her forehead, and one on each side of her face. But the youngest sister was different. Her name was Two-Eyes, and that's just what she had.
 
In this playful retelling of a tale from the Brothers Grimm, a young lady with cruel sisters gets help from an old woman, a handsome knight, and some magical verses -- and in the end finds out she is not so alone as she believed.
 
Rated "A" by Entertainment Weekly
2007 New York Public Library's "100 Titles for Reading and Sharing"
 
/////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
Aaron Shepard is the award-winning author of "The Legend of Lightning Larry," "The Adventures of Mouse Deer," "The Sea King's Daughter," "The Baker's Dozen," and many more kids' books. His stories also appear often in Cricket magazine.
 
Gary Clement is a political cartoonist for Canada's National Post, and the winner of the 1999 Canadian Governor General's Literary Award for Children's Literature, Illustration. 
 
/////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
"Scrappy little Two-Eyes is an especially appealing character. . . . Many classic Grimm tales are downright frightening, but this modern retelling manages to stay very close to the original while making it completely accessible to today's kids." -- Tina Jordan, Entertainment Weekly, Jan. 18, 2007, "A" rating
 
"Shepard proves that updating a classic can be a treat for a new generation of readers." -- Publishers Weekly, Nov. 13, 2006
 
"Wry fun for the early grades." -- Kirkus Reviews, Nov. 15, 2006
 
"An old tale gets a facelift in this lively version. . . . On the way to happily-ever-after, a good time will be had by all." -- Ilene Cooper, Booklist, Jan. 1, 2007
 
"Children will enjoy the humor in this reincarnation. . . . Will make excellent fodder for reader's theater, with a script available on the author's Web site." -- Grace Oliff, School Library Journal, Jan. 2007
 
"This may be a Grimm tale, but it is not a grim one. . . . . The broad comedy of Gary Clement's watercolor illustrations is a treat. . . . . Adult readers will enjoy sly touches." -- Susan Perren, The Globe and Mail (Toronto), Jan. 20, 2007
 
"Shepard's twist of having Two-Eyes be the unusual one adds the type of humor young readers often enjoy most, where they are in on the joke." -- The Horn Book, Jan.-Feb., 2007
 
/////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
Now, the sisters owned a goat, and every day Two-Eyes took it to the meadow to graze. One morning, when she'd had hardly anything to eat, she sat in the grass and cried her two eyes out.
 
All at once, an old woman stood before her. But the biggest surprise was that this woman had two eyes, just like Two-Eyes herself.
 
"What's wrong, my dear?" asked the woman.
 
"It's my sisters," Two-Eyes told her. "They never give me enough to eat."
 
"Don't worry about that!" said the woman. "You can have as much as you like. Just say to your goat,
 
    'Bleat, goat, bleat.
    And bring me lots to eat!'
 
Then you'll have plenty. When you don't want any more, just say,
 
    'Bleat, goat, bleat.
    I've had so much to eat!'
 
Then the rest will vanish. Just like this."
 
And the old woman vanished -- just like that.
 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:52 -0400)

A retelling of a classic fairy tale about a little girl who has two eyes and is horribly teased by her sisters who have one and three eyes respectively.

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