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Aesop's Fables (Illustrated Junior…
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Aesop's Fables (Illustrated Junior Library)

by Aesop

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I like Aesop's fables because of the simple stories that relate back to a moral. I don’t like some of the stories' because of the cruelness of some of them. These stories have been retold many times but still possess the same stories with the morals being connected. ( )
  AllisonHood | Jul 18, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0448060035, Hardcover)

'The story goes that a sow who had delivered a whole litter of piglets loudly accosted a lioness. "How many children do you breed?" asked the sow. "I breed only one," said the lioness, "but he is very well bred!"' The fables of Aesop have become one of the most enduring traditions of European culture, ever since they were first written down nearly two millennia ago. Aesop was reputedly a tongue-tied slave who miraculously received the power of speech; from his legendary storytelling came the collections of prose and verse fables scattered throughout Greek and Roman literature. First published in English by Caxton in 1484, the fables and their morals continue to charm modern readers: who does not know the stories of the tortoise and the hare, and the boy who cried wolf? This new translation is the first to represent all the main fable collections in ancient Latin and Greek, arranged according to the fables' contents and themes. It includes 600 fables, many of which come from sources never before translated into English.

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 10 Jun 2016 13:17:25 -0400)

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A collection of the brief animal tales with specific morals which are attributed to a Greek slave.

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