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The drums of winter Uksuum cauyai [video…
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The drums of winter Uksuum cauyai [video recording] (1988)

by Leonard J. Kamerling, Sarah M. Elder

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Filmed in 1988 in Emmonak, Alaska a remote village where the Yukon empties into the Bering Sea, the Yup'ik Eskimo villagers prepare for a potlach ceremony and the arrival of neighboring villagers. Archival footage is mixed with interviews with elders, scenes of family life, preparing the dance hall, fixing costumes, practicing traditional and new dance steps and songs, and portions of the ceremony itself. Subtle and moving. In 2006 the Library of Congress' National Film Preservation Board choose this film and 24 others for it's permanent preservation collection for it's cultural and aesthetic importance. Made by ethnographic filmmakers Sarah M. Elder and Leonard J. Kamerling. Two discs, total runtime of 91 min.
  CtrSacredSciences | Jun 12, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kamerling, Leonard J.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Elder, Sarah M.main authorall editionsconfirmed
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Title Card: "Emmonak, Alaska is a Yup'ik Eskimo community of 500 on the Bering Sea coast at the mouth of the Yukon River. Despite decades of Western pressure, dance in Emmonak has survived. In many Alaska villages it has been lost."
Title Card: "Dance was at the heart of Yup'ik Eskimo spiritual and social life. It was the bridge between a person's own power and the greater powers of the unseen world. At the heart of dance was the drum in which could be heard the cadence of the universe."
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