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Like a Virgin
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Like a Virgin

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Recently added byaskajnaiman

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I was gifted this book as part of the GoodReads giveaway.

"Like a Virgin" is, first, highly readable. As a happily childless woman I am not particularly interested in the ins and outs of the uterus (the reason I wanted to read this was the more science fictional aspects explored) but even the biology parts were made interesting by not overly complicated explanations that leave you with a good general idea of things going from DNA splitting to the consequences of assisted reproduction, both physical and cultural (eg. India is rife with young women becoming surrogate mothers for foreigners who can pay them a third of what they would pay a woman in their countries).

Since same sex couples were mentioned quite a bit (enough to be inclusive, let´s say). Interestingly, there´s a rat in Japan that has two mummies, one of which donated a younger egg that somehow was used to fertilize the mature egg of the first.

Y chromosomes are, many fear, on their way out, as they have only 80 genes to the 1000 or more of the X and since they have to partner with an X chromosome when an embryo is created, they cannot exchange genetic information to "update" themselves, being limited to reshuffling the genes internally. Of course, without Y chromosomes regular males cannot be produced (fertile XY males), making a possibility of the all female world like many proposed in sci-fi (are there any biologically all-male worlds? I know of some where women and men live separately but none were women have disappeared).

Very interesting, my only concern reading this in May 2014 is that the information might by now be slightly outdated or at least not fully updated. Such is the destiny of printed press, another disappearing model. Because of that and the fact that it´s not very in-depth (It´s not MEANT to be but I feel a little more would not have hurt the readability factor) I'm giving it 3.5 stars.

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  askajnaiman | Jun 14, 2016 |
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