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The Undoing Project: A Friendship That…
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The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds (original 2016; edition 2017)

by Michael Lewis (Author)

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7353212,706 (3.72)35
Member:johnboles
Title:The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds
Authors:Michael Lewis (Author)
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2017), Edition: 1, 368 pages
Collections:Non-Fiction
Rating:****
Tags:None

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The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds by Michael Lewis (2016)

  1. 30
    Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (Stbalbach)
    Stbalbach: About Kahneman's early days working with Tversky on cognitive biases, his work on prospect theory, and his later work on happiness.
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Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
Thorough analysis of a friendship between two brilliant men who, together, revolutionized attitudes toward the reliability of basing studies of decision-making purely on the concept of a "rational" person.

Personally, since statistics was one of my favorite college courses, i was slowed in reading this by my desire to thoroughly understand the concepts presented. That was what fascinated. Am not really sure how someone without that history would respond to the book -- probably just as a study of a friendship. Definitely worth my time. ( )
  abycats | May 11, 2018 |
I was familiar with the work of the book's two protagonists (Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky) before reading this book, so my reading focused on the relationship between the two men. This was very well portrayed by the author. Mr. Lewis was able to get deeply into that relationship, showing us just how close the two were, and the sadness of their drifting apart. He also described their work in enough detail to show its important contribution to the worlds of economics and psychology. Very well done. ( )
  LynnB | Apr 10, 2018 |
This book was recommended to me by the headmaster of my daughter’s school. I’m guessing it’s because I’m Israeli, and the book is about two Israelis. As is the case with many book recommendations, this turned out to be an excellent one.

Michael Lewis wrote the story of two Israeli psychologists, Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, who met in the late 1960s at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Their collaborative work, over a decade and a half, laid the foundations for what is known today as behavioural economics. It seems natural today for economists to explain human behaviour in terms of irrational decisions (see Dan Ariely’s books), but 40-50 years ago, the underlying assumption was that people were rational beings and that all economic decisions were made based on rational choices. When I studied economics at the Hebrew University in the 1990s, this assumption was still very much valid for most of what I was taught.

Lewis does a fabulous job of weaving the story of the separate, yet intertwined, lives of Kahneman and Tversky. He describes their joint work but also their personal relationship and some of the personal conflicts and dilemmas they faced. They had very different characters, but a huge respect for each other and a collaboration that one of their wives described as “stronger than marriage”. They devised simple experiments that showed how every person is affected by biases, regardless of their level of education or experience. Using examples from sports, academia, business, the military and much more, Lewis illustrates how these experiments uncovered previously unknown human traits. They did not continue working together after the mid 1980s, when they had a fallout, hence the “undoing” in the book’s title.

Tversky died from cancer in 1996, at the age of 59. Kahneman received the Nobel prize for Economics in 2002.

The closing chapter of the book brought a tear to my eyes, not something one expects when reading a book about psychology and economics. It is a testament to the moving power of this book, which fittingly for a book about psychologists, focuses on the human nature of these towering giants of academic brilliance. ( )
  ashergabbay | Feb 13, 2018 |
What you believe or think may not be so. The premise of this book is that what you see is not always what you get. Fascinating reading that makes you think twice about what you know and believe. A great story about how two unlikely people became life long friends and challenged each other think about the world a different way. ( )
  foof2you | Jan 1, 2018 |
Fascinating! And funny. I only wish I understood some of it more.
  chasidar | Dec 27, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
Lewis is the ideal teller of the story. [...] But he is also a vastly better raconteur than most other writers playing the explication game. You laugh when you read his books. You see his protagonists in three dimensions — deeply likable, but also flawed, just like most of your friends and family.
 

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Michael Lewisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Boutsikaris, DennisReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393254593, Hardcover)

Best-selling author Michael Lewis examines how a Nobel Prize–winning theory of the mind altered our perception of reality.

Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments about uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis’s own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms.

The Undoing Project is about the fascinating collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield―both had important careers in the Israeli military―and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind’s view of its own mind.

(retrieved from Amazon Sat, 18 Jun 2016 18:51:38 -0400)

Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis's own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms.The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield--both had important careers in the Israeli military--and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn't remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter.This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind's view of its own mind.… (more)

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