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Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille by…
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Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille

by Jen Bryant

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I read this book while standing in line at the children's desk in my local library. I knew nothing about Louis Braille, so it was all news to me. Very interesting, very sad, but also quite inspiring to hear how a young, blind, man could achieve so much. This illustrations are excellent. Poor Louis' injury and subsequent blindness are horrible and distressing. ( )
  themulhern | Nov 13, 2017 |
What a lovely book! I was very unfamiliar with Louis Braille, and the idea that he created Braille. Learning about the name and history behind such an impactful invention was really mind blowing to me. I had never thought to do research on this invention, but I am so glad I read this story. The illustrations in this book complimented the story so well, as the illustrator shows what it is like to "live in the dark" as a person who is blind. Because Louis grew up in France, the author also includes some French words and phrases into the story to emphasis Louis's culture and where he comes from. ( )
  bbabb | Nov 7, 2017 |
I recently read “Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille” which is a very touching story about the man who invented the language of braille. He had an amazing life and it really opens your eyes to something that you were not aware of before. I liked this book for a couple reasons; the illustrations and the information it provides.
The illustrations in this book really help make the story. Considering this story is about a boy who loses his sight at a young age and invents his own language I guess that would make sense. The beginning of the book and the end of the book actually showcase the braille alphabet as well as have a pronunciation guide for the more difficult words. The illustrations, especially when detailing Louis strengths as a young boy really capture what he is capable of doing. He liked to play dominoes with his mother and I think this is where he got the idea for the braille language. The illustrations also showcase how exactly he made the braille language. It shows the frame with the metal piece as well as the stylus he used to poke the indents. The illustrations help to engage younger readers and also help older readers to really understand the story of young Louis Braille.
The information this book provides is also fascinating. Louis Braille was a five-year-old boy when he lost his sight in an unfortunate accident and he was so determined to read again that he invented his own language. This story is the definition of inspiring. The story also does a good job of not only showcasing what his strengths were but also his weaknesses. The author starts off by saying how smart Louis was but when he lost his sight he could not do the things he used to do. The author wanted to show everyone how Louis felt and she did a good job, “I didn’t want people to feel sorry for me. I just wanted to read and to write on my own, like everyone else”. The author also answers many direct questions at the end of the book which provide even more information about the life of Louis Braille.
This story is about Louis Braille and about how he invented the language of braille. This language is so important to the blind community. The book is not only about Louis Braille inventing the language, about his life, but it is also about how it felt to be Louis Braille. ( )
  kduke1 | Oct 19, 2017 |
diversity assignment
  rainablu | Aug 15, 2017 |
A super sweet story of how Louis Braille invented the alphabet and numerical system we know as Braille. It really captures the feelings of Louis and is told from his point of view as a child. ( )
  lispylibrarian | Aug 7, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0449813371, Hardcover)

An inspiring picture-book biography of Louis Braille—a blind boy so determined to read that he invented his own alphabet.
 
Louis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read.
 
Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him.
 
And so he invented his own alphabet—a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.
 
Award-winning writer Jen Bryant tells Braille’s inspiring story with a lively and accessible text, filled with the sounds, the smells, and the touch of Louis’s world. Boris Kulikov’s inspired paintings help readers to understand what Louis lost, and what he was determined to gain back through books.
 
An author’s note and additional resources at the end of the book complement the simple story and offer more information for parents and teachers.

(retrieved from Amazon Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:21:17 -0400)

Louis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read. Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him. And so he invented his own alphabet -- a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.… (more)

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