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The Tidal Zone by Sarah Moss
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The Tidal Zone (2016)

by Sarah Moss

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1267135,973 (3.98)46
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    Night Waking by Sarah Moss (Anonymous user)
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
A great read about the daily life - especially life in these modern times.

For a complete review please click on the link below:

http://onerightword.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/tidal-zone-sarah-moss.html ( )
  ashkrishwrites | Aug 29, 2018 |
A very fine piece of work, for which I thank jeniwren for the recommendation. As a father who has worked in a university and spent a lot of time as home-maker parent, I could really relate to the main character in this book. Dr Moss seems to be very perceptive about the experiences of a man who is both looking after children and yet trying to maintain a position in the world of paid work.The real heart of the book, however, is the story of a parent's response to a teenage daughter's near-death experience in which the cause of the incident cannot be definitively established and therefore could recur at any time. The author explores the impact on all the individuals and their relationship to each other. How do you deal with the ever-present risk of death from a killer with unknown identity, and yet live some semblance of normal life? All this is set in the context of a very modern family, living in a world of Brexit, terrorist threats, and obsessive attention to the risks of child molesters. This isn't a perfect book, but for me it was right up there in the top 10%. I found both daughters, but especially the teenager, just a little too precocious to be believable. I'm certainly glad my own daughter was kinder to me in her teenage years. ( )
  oldblack | Sep 17, 2017 |
I was a bit worried reading a book about an unknown medical issue might make me anxious, but I really rather loved this book. I could have done without the cathedral building (not necessary for the plot in my opinion). The father subverting gender rolls was a nice change of pace. I also really enjoyed the way the children were written. Overall for anyone who enjoys a character driven book and doesn't mind the ending not being tied up in a bow. ( )
  SadieRuin | Jul 28, 2017 |
This is the first novel I've read by Sarah Moss. I wanted to read it after seeing a review describing it as a 'state of the nation' novel with a focus on the NHS, an issue of great importance to most British people.

The first section had me hooked straight away; Moss writes beautifully and knows how to evoke particular emotions perfectly. Once the main narrative is underway, I found myself slightly conflicted over the three main stories being told. I really liked the main story involving Adam and his family, and also the story of his father's search for happiness in the US, but the Coventry Cathedral sections didn't really work for me, as I didn't quite get why they were there.

Despite this, I thought this was a great novel overall. Moss hits the nail on the head several times over the various problems within the NHS and how they affect both staff and patients and their families. As someone who works in a university, I also enjoyed the rather uncanny descriptions of university life (but then again they would be, as Moss is a lecturer herself!). I will definitely look up Moss's other novels. ( )
  mooingzelda | Jun 5, 2017 |
The latest novel by the brilliant English writer Sarah Moss is set in a contemporary Midlands town and is narrated by Adam, a non-tenured academician who teaches entry level courses at the local university and spends the majority of his time working on a book about the bombing and rebuilding of Coventry Cathedral and tending to the home and his family, his 15 and 8 year old daughters Miriam and Rose, and his wife Emma, an overworked general practitioner for the National Health Service. The family is an ordinary one, until one day tragedy strikes: Miriam goes into sudden cardiorespiratory arrest at school, is successfully resuscitated, and is admitted to hospital for further evaluation. Her mysterious condition places a great strain on every member of the family: Adam's passive-aggressive tendencies, anxieties and insecurities are expressed as verbal darts thrown at his wife; Emma wrestles with her dual roles as a even-keeled clinician and a terrified mother who fears every parent's worst nightmare, that they will outlive their child; Rose feels both unimportant and anxious over her sister's uncertain condition, and displays apparent indifference toward Miriam's plight and makes repeated unreasonable, selfish demands on her parents; and Miriam, a very intelligent, independent minded and defiant teen, who seethes at being admitted to hospital, not having medical decision making capability, and, underneath it all, fears her own mortality.

The family must recover from the lightning bolt from the sky that has altered all of their lives, and adjust to the "new normal", similar to many of the families I see in my role as a pediatric hospitalist whose children are given life altering or life threatening medical diagnoses during their stay in hospital, and to other individuals, families and groups who are stricken by tragedy and must pick themselves up and recover from a sudden shock.

Moss does a fabulous job in portraying these four as very believable, imperfect and sympathetic individuals, and, despite the difference between the British and American health care systems, the experiences Adam, Emma and Miriam had with the NHS rang true as well.

"The Tidal Zone" is another outstanding effort by one of England's most talented writers, which I liked only slightly less than her brilliant earlier novel "Bodies of Light". It was chosen for this year's fabulous Wellcome Book Prize shortlist, and despite the strength of the field, this novel would be a worthy winner of this superb literary award. ( )
4 vote kidzdoc | Apr 8, 2017 |
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Adam is a stay-at-home dad who is also working on a history of the bombing and rebuilding of Coventry Cathedral. He is a good man and he is happy. But one day, he receives a call from his daughter's school to inform him that, for no apparent reason, fifteen-year-old Miriam has collapsed and stopped breathing. In that moment, he is plunged into a world of waiting, agonising, not knowing. The story of his life and the lives of his family are rewritten and re-told around this shocking central event, around a body that has inexplicably failed. In this exceptionally courageous and unflinching novel of contemporary life Sarah Moss goes where most of us wouldn't dare to look, and the result is riveting - unbearably sad, but also miraculously funny and ultimately hopeful. The Tidal Zone explores parental love, overwhelming fear, illness and recovery. It is about clever teenagers and the challenges of marriage. It is about the NHS, academia, sex and gender in the twenty-first century, the work-life juggle, and the politics of packing lunches and loading dishwashers. It confirms Sarah Moss as a unique voice in modern fiction and a writer of luminous intelligence.
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Adam is a stay-at-home dad who is also working on a history of the bombing and rebuilding of Coventry Cathedral. He is a good man and he is happy. But one day, he receives a call from his daughter's school to inform him that, for no apparent reason, fifteen-year-old Miriam has collapsed and stopped breathing. In that moment, he is plunged into a world of waiting, agonising, not knowing. The story of his life and the lives of his family are rewritten and re-told around this shocking central event, around a body that has inexplicably failed. In this exceptionally courageous and unflinching novel of contemporary life Sarah Moss goes where most of us wouldn't dare to look, and the result is riveting unbearably sad, but also miraculously funny and ultimately hopeful. The Tidal Zone explores parental love, overwhelming fear, illness and recovery. It is about clever teenagers and the challenges of marriage. It is about the NHS, academia, sex and gender in the twenty-first century, the work-life juggle, and the politics of packing lunches and loading dishwashers.… (more)

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