HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear by…
Loading...

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear

by Danielle Ofri

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6225271,265 (3.96)19

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 19 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book is amazing and I can't recommend it enough. If you've ever been frustrated at the doctor's office, here's a glimpse into why. Doctors and patients could both benefit from reading the stories and perspectives shared here. ( )
  Shadow123 | Sep 2, 2018 |
A book for all patients, doctors, and medical professionals in general. Ofri reviews many studies, done by others and replicated in her own practice, which demonstrate the wide disparity in expectations and results for both doctors and patients. She discusses how each is perceived by the other and gives many examples of how communication, and therefore medical success, can be improved.

The first few chapters are the most rewarding for patients to read, and I've already started changing my approach to appointments to help focus a doctor's attention on what is most important to me. Much of the rest of the book will be of more use to professionals, but even there patients can learn a great deal about what goes into having a good doctor/patient interaction and relationship. There is even a chapter on ways for doctors and hospitals to approach situations which might lead to malpractice suits, therefore enabling them to possibly satisfy patients with less pain for everyone. ( )
  auntmarge64 | Aug 21, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I found this to be a very good read and very interesting how important communication is in the doctor/patient relationship. Verbal exchange between patient and physician is vital and is the cornerstone of a correct medical diagnosis. Making assumptions is the worst thing you can do as a doctor and a patient. This book provided several examples of good communication as well as where it may have been improved on both sides. When a physician is empathetic and concerned for the health and welfare of the patient, the patient is more likely to follow the instructions. The role of listening and making yourself clear is not totally the role of the doctor. Often times the patient hides things because they are too embarrassed - illiteracy or abuse comes to mind. Active listening by the physician goes beyond words and they are able to pick up cues to provide better care. "When people talk, listen completely" Ernest Hemingway. ( )
  berthashaver | Jul 21, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
An interesting look at problems that arise from the lack of communication between doctors and patients. The examples that Dr. Ofri use to show road blocks in communication were eye opening. Just listening without interruption and distractions would go far in cutting the number of errors and misunderstandings. Sadly in this day of electronics I fear that communication will fall even farther back on the list of priorities and skills.

This was an interesting read, very eye opening! ( )
  cal8769 | Jun 28, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book should be reading for doctors and patients alike. The book focuses on (obviously) the breakdown between doctors and patients in communication. This is a critical subject, because as the book states correctly, despite all of our advances in medical technology, we continue to rely on the interaction and verbalization of a complaint. It's alarming that so many of us spend so little time contemplating the virtue of improving communication when it can literally be a matter of life and death. The book does a good job of walking through several problems for which we should be on the lookout. In this era of focus on medicine and healthcare, when patient interaction is mere moments, practitioners must utilize the very best techniques. I received an early reviewer copy of this book and I recommend it. ( )
  MrStrand | Jun 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0807062634, Hardcover)

How refocusing conversations between doctors and their patients can lead to better health

Despite modern medicine’s infatuation with high-tech gadgetry, the single most powerful diagnostic tool is the doctor-patient conversation, which can uncover the lion’s share of illnesses. However, what patients say and what doctors hear are often two vastly different things.

Patients, anxious to convey their symptoms, feel an urgency to “make their case” to their doctors. Doctors, under pressure to be efficient, multitask while patients speak and often miss the key elements. Add in stereotypes, unconscious bias, conflicting agendas, and the fear of lawsuits and the risk of misdiagnosis and medical errors multiplies dangerously.

Though the gulf between what patients say and what doctors hear is often wide, Dr. Danielle Ofri proves that it doesn’t have to be. Through the powerfully resonant human stories that Ofri is celebrated for, she explores the high-stakes world of doctor-patient communication that we all must navigate. Reporting on the latest research studies and interviewing scholars, doctors, and patients, Ofri reveals how better communication can lead to better health for all of us.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 06 Sep 2016 19:30:16 -0400)

"Patients, anxious to convey their symptoms, feel an urgency to "make their case" to their doctors. Doctors, under pressure to be efficient, multitask while patients speak and often miss the key elements. Add in stereotypes, unconscious bias, conflicting agendas, and fear of lawsuits and the risk of misdiagnosis and medical errors multiplies dangerously. ... Reporting on the latest research studies and interviewing scholars, doctors, and patients, Dr. Ofri reveals how better communication can lead to better health for all of us."-- From book jacket.… (more)

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Danielle Ofri's book What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 13
4.5
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,994,644 books! | Top bar: Always visible