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Love Warrior: A Memoir by Glennon Doyle
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Love Warrior: A Memoir (edition 2017)

by Glennon Doyle (Author), Glennon Doyle Melton (Author)

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5201933,546 (3.69)6
Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out, three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list, her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, rock bottom was a familiar place to Glennon. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
I nearly cried, I cheered, and I rejoiced in Glennon's "a-ha" moments as she tells the story of her brokenness, recovery, and resurrection as a "love warrior". ( )
  heatherdw20 | Jul 23, 2020 |
This review was originally posted on Rachel Reading. For hundreds more reviews like this, come check it out!

Originally when I saw that this book had been chosen for Oprah's Book Club I was ecstatic. I love Glennon Doyle. I read "Carry On, Warrior" and it has a quote in it that I want to get painted on the wall when I have kids for them to memorize and have on their heart. I love her heart for Jesus and that it isn't tied to a specific denomination (or non-denomination) just..solely Him, and her walk through life. Glennon's open honesty and just painful truth sometimes is actually one of the reasons I started my Millennial Christian blog collective because I realized how powerful her stories were to me, just because she was unafraid to write about things.

In this book, Glennon talks very candidly about her life, how her marriage came to be, and the brutally honest struggles they went through. Mainly, when it came out that her husband had cheated on her multiple times, and consistently throughout her marriage. Glennon doesn't hold back what she's feeling throughout this entire memoir and I think that's why I love it so much. She talks about her failings and places where she struggled, and is just completely open and honest with her anger and stages of grief and mourning as she and Craig both try to answer the question, "What's next?" Craig makes it clear to Glennon that he wants to try again, and do it right and she isn't sure if she's ready for that.

This story is raw, and beautiful, and hard. And I think that's what I love most about Glennon Doyle, because she seems so bravely unafraid to bear her soul to the world. Almost like "I've been through enough, what else could I lose when I could have everything to gain?" and it makes me feel like she's one of my closest friends, that I can call up and just talk to about how terrible my life is and then crawl into her shawl while she holds me and tells me it's going to be okay. I cried with her in the book, and just wanted to buy her coffee and give her a hug and sit with her in the hard times.

I was surprised how much I absolutely loved this book and tore through it. I never wanted this book to end, because I love Glennon Doyle more than most authors I think. I totally understand why Oprah picked it for her book club. ( )
  rachelreading | Apr 20, 2020 |
3.5 ( )
  chauveaux | Sep 11, 2019 |
The wider culture which is a backbone feature of this book affects males too. Men have feelings too. None of us invented the culture into which we were deposited. As the book progressed I had increasing sadness and disappointment. Her disdain for sexuality, her fears, her obsessions, her "two faced" presence in the world are common.

Everyone has their own perspective and this book is about a popular and attractive female feeling lack of power while describing her life of abject power she often wields cruelly. She laments her betrayal, until the end blaming her husband, while documenting her major role in all of the dysfunction. She seemed incredibly selfish and narcissistic throughout the book, seldom even glimpsing her part in her discomfort and how she has affected those in her life.

She ends with great insight but it felt like the terrible phase (which she relates to grief) was miraculously overcome by some yoga with meditation. This is a woman who had decades of exposure to a recovery program where all of the principles which she ultimately espouses are central, on the daily. Yet a few yoga sessions reveal these truths and strategies? It feels like the tension in the storyline was embellished or enhanced in order to sell more books.

I am very saddened by books like this. Not all men who are now alive are to blame for our cultural shortcomings, especially as it relates to sexuality. Men and women are both caught in this twisted culture as it relates to sexuality. I pray the blaming decreases and the insight, sharing, solution seeking, bridge building, barrier defeating, movement toward deep and abiding love and sharing will increase. Women have much more power in the realm of sex. A failure to recognize that and wield it justly should be part of the dialog eventually. The solutions in this arena are complex and deep seated, deeper than racism and our form of unjust capitalism which seems terrifyingly pervasive. A new, objective, open minded look at all of the dysfunction and its permutations is necessary. The simple themes of this book mask the much bigger and more complex problems.

All of that being said, she ends the book with a spiritual transformation, an attainment of maturity of self with the help of God as she understands God. Her journey was a path for her attaining an abiding, sustaining and true faith. This message was redeeming but then I read the Wikipedia article about the author and that put a chink in everything. ( )
  DonaldPowell | Feb 5, 2019 |
I know I'm in the minority but I found the book to be pretty irritating. Maybe it was the audiobook that set the tone for me not liking it but I found the author to be self-absorbed and her epiphanies were quite one-sided. It wasn't until much later in her memoir that she actually started to think about what it might be like for someone else (i.e. her husband) She sort of understood that forgiveness and healing are hers for the taking and god shines down upon us all (but not her husband!) Her explorations of god and the yoga mat are pretty pedestrian and I know, I know...don't judge the spiritual path of another. I have read some memoirs where the author breaks the fuck open and becomes the pile of misery you must be to start rising up and rebuilding and I was inspired. I did not feel inspired by this, it felt whiney and rife with judgements. ( )
  ambersnowpants | Aug 23, 2018 |
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Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out, three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list, her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, rock bottom was a familiar place to Glennon. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life.

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