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Transit: A Novel (Outline Trilogy (2)) by…
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Transit: A Novel (Outline Trilogy (2)) (original 2016; edition 2017)

by Rachel Cusk (Author)

Series: Outline Trilogy (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4732337,736 (3.91)27
"The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline, one of The New York Times Book Review's ten best books of 2015 In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. The process of upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions--personal, moral, artistic, practical--as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children. In the city she is made to confront aspects of living she has, until now, avoided, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, and believe in, life. Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed Outline, and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering, the moral problems of personal responsibility, and the mystery of change. In this precise, short, and yet epic cycle of novels, Cusk manages to describe the most elemental experiences, the liminal qualities of life, through a narrative near-silence that draws language toward it. She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one's life and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real. "--"Sequel to Rachel Cusk's Outline"--… (more)
Member:mgeorgebrown89
Title:Transit: A Novel (Outline Trilogy (2))
Authors:Rachel Cusk (Author)
Info:Picador (2017), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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Transit by Rachel Cusk (2016)

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» See also 27 mentions

English (20)  German (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (22)
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Finally finishing the trilogy after reading out of order, but fills in some gaps. Same writing style that I love where each person the narrator encounters gets a monologue essentially as they expound on themselves or a topic dear to them. Here it’s a builder, a best friend, some dates, and professional colleagues. She has just moved to London after the breakup of her marriage and there is a flat to renovate and some conflict with completely toxic neighbors downstairs, which seems to be the central intrigue but is left unresolved. Also some ambiguous anecdotes about mothering and her two children - she has custody, but isn’t devoted to it. Same great observations about life and human nature thrown in off-handedly: “by failing he had created loss and loss was the threshold to freedom.” This comes in a casual conversation with a dog-walker. There are profound moments everywhere when one is attuned. Not a book for readers who need action. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
Maybe it's not surprising that a novel made up of personal stories told by strangers to the narrator would be such a page turner. I know I always enjoy hearing dramatic stories from friends, even if I've never met the person in question, and probably never will. Compared with Outline, we do see more of the narrator and her surroundings in this story. She certainly is in transit – between homes, between lives. I also liked that during the party at the end, someone finally notices that she asks such detailed thoughtful questions of strangers – and she admits that she's listening to try and learn something about life in general. I'm looking forward to reading the final installment. ( )
  nancyjean19 | Jun 3, 2020 |
Doesn't quite reach the insight heights of Outline, and, in many ways I think the middle of a trilogy, is, exactly as the title says, a transit, and it is difficult for it not to wander a bit. But I never felt anything but hooked in by Cusk's new cast of strangers ready to monologue their deepest feelings to her narrator at a moment's notice. There is something in the plain artificiality of the project that makes it feel so real and that is, simply, magical. ( )
  Aaron.Cohen | May 28, 2020 |
This second in the three connected novels takes a darker turn. We also learn a little more about the end of the narrator's own marriage as she listens to and comments on--revealing some of her own experiences since divorcing--to the people she talks with. She has bought a run-down house in a good neighborhood in London, once a single family house since turned by the housing authorities into a council house but now reverting as the council folk die or move on. She acquires the neighbors from hell ,who live in a state of perpetual rage in the basement. She decides she must improve the house and starts construction in her half - including soundproofing the floors between herself and this miserable couple. The narrator is focussed now on the plight of the lone woman with children (which we can glean by what she notices and writes about). Can she endure the stress of the house make-over, the horrible neighbors, and the increasing signs that her own ex may not be all that committed to parenting their two boys? The title reflects the lack of stability, absent in the first novel, and while
the overall "tone" in the writing, just this side of a calm deadpan is similar to book 1, it now has an undercurrent of impending doom or chaos. Maybe, or maybe not? Wait and see in book 3. ****1/2 ( )
  sibylline | Apr 15, 2020 |
Trilogy.
  skiteam | Apr 5, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
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An astrologer emailed me to say she had important news for me concerning events in my immediate future.
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Freiheit ist, [...] wenn man aus dem Haus geht und es kein Zurück gibt.
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"The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline, one of The New York Times Book Review's ten best books of 2015 In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. The process of upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions--personal, moral, artistic, practical--as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children. In the city she is made to confront aspects of living she has, until now, avoided, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, and believe in, life. Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed Outline, and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering, the moral problems of personal responsibility, and the mystery of change. In this precise, short, and yet epic cycle of novels, Cusk manages to describe the most elemental experiences, the liminal qualities of life, through a narrative near-silence that draws language toward it. She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one's life and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real. "--"Sequel to Rachel Cusk's Outline"--

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