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The 60s: The Story of a Decade (New Yorker:…
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The 60s: The Story of a Decade (New Yorker: The Story of a Decade) (edition 2016)

by The New Yorker Magazine (Author)

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Member:WilliamReinhart
Title:The 60s: The Story of a Decade (New Yorker: The Story of a Decade)
Authors:The New Yorker Magazine (Author)
Info:Random House (2016), 720 pages
Collections:Your library
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The 60s: The Story of a Decade by The New Yorker Magazine

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Introduction IT’S DIFFICULT TO think of William Shawn, the reserved and courteous man who edited The New Yorker from 1952 to 1987, as a figure of the sixties.
THESE DAYS, THE quarter century between the Second World War and the 1970s seems like at least an American silver age.
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About a year ago, the screams of the Beatles’ teen-age fans abated somewhat, and other voices began to be heard, saying that the Beatles were “going too far,” or were “burned out,” or were “getting too serious,” or weren’t “funny anymore.” Now Sgt. Pepper is out, and it’s a huge success, and we’ve been talking to some record people about it.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679644830, Hardcover)

The third installment of a fascinating decade-by-decade series, this anthology collects historic New Yorker pieces from the most tumultuous years of the twentieth century—including work by James Baldwin, Pauline Kael, Sylvia Plath, Roger Angell, Muriel Spark, and John Updike—alongside new assessments of the 1960s by some of today’s finest writers.
 
Here are real-time accounts of these years of turmoil: Calvin Trillin reports on the integration of Southern universities, E. B. White and John Updike wrestle with the enormity of the Kennedy assassination, and Jonathan Schell travels with American troops into the jungles of Vietnam. The murder of Martin Luther King, Jr., the fallout of the 1968 Democratic Convention, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Six-Day War: All are brought to immediate and profound life in these pages.
 
The New Yorker of the 1960s was also the wellspring of some of the truly timeless works of American journalism. Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem, and James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time all first appeared in The New Yorker and are featured here. The magazine also published such indelible short story masterpieces as John Cheever’s “The Swimmer” and John Updike’s “A & P,” alongside poems by Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton.
 
The arts underwent an extraordinary transformation during the decade, one mirrored by the emergence in The New Yorker of critical voices as arresting as Pauline Kael and Kenneth Tynan. Among the crucial cultural figures profiled here are Simon & Garfunkel, Tom Stoppard, Bob Dylan, Allen Ginsberg, Cassius Clay (before he was Muhammad Ali), and Mike Nichols and Elaine May.
 
The assembled pieces are given fascinating contemporary context by current New Yorker writers, including Jill Lepore, Malcolm Gladwell, and David Remnick. The result is an incomparable collective portrait of a truly galvanizing era.

Advance praise for The 60s: The Story of a Decade

“The third installment in the esteemed magazine’s superb decades series . . . The contributor list is an embarrassment of riches. . . . The hits continue. Bring on the '70s.”Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“[The 60s] deserves a lasting place on one’s shelves. Like its predecessors in the series, this collection is a time capsule and a keeper.”Booklist

(retrieved from Amazon Sat, 22 Oct 2016 12:54:48 -0400)

Here are real-time accounts of these years of turmoil: Calvin Trillin reports on the integration of Southern universities, E. B. White and John Updike wrestle with the enormity of the Kennedy assassination, and Jonathan Schell travels with American troops into the jungles of Vietnam. The murder of Martin Luther King, Jr., the fallout of the 1968 Democratic Convention, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Six-Day War: All are brought to immediate and profound life in these pages. The New Yorker of the 1960s was also the wellspring of some of the truly timeless works of American journalism. Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem, and James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time all first appeared in The New Yorker and are featured here. The magazine also published such indelible short story masterpieces as John Cheever's "The Swimmer" and John Updike's "A & P," alongside poems by Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. The arts underwent an extraordinary transformation during the decade, one mirrored by the emergence in The New Yorker of critical voices as arresting as Pauline Kael and Kenneth Tynan. Among the crucial cultural figures profiled here are Simon & Garfunkel, Tom Stoppard, Bob Dylan, Allen Ginsberg, Cassius Clay (before he was Muhammad Ali), and Mike Nichols and Elaine May. The assembled pieces are given fascinating contemporary context by current New Yorker writers, including Jill Lepore, Malcolm Gladwell, and David Remnick. The result is an incomparable collective portrait of a truly galvanizing era.… (more)

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