HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey by Jane…
Loading...

Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey (edition 2000)

by Jane Goodall (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8731618,301 (4)15
"Dr. Jane Goodall's revolutionary study of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe preserve forever altered the very, definition of "humanity." Now, in a poignant and insightful memoir, Jane Goodall explores her extraordinary life and personal spiritual odyssey, with observations as profound as the knowledge she has brought back from the forest." "It has been a life blessed with faith, resolve, and purpose, though not without its crises. Jane Goodall endured the horrors of the London blitz and World War II, postwar hardships, vicious rumors and "establishment" assaults on the integrity of her work, a terrorist attack and hostage taking in Africa, and her husband's slow, agonizing death. But throughout, her religious convictions, although tested, have helped her survive - and Jane Goodall's pursuit of science has enhanced, not eroded, her belief in God." "In this book she candidly shares her life - talking of the love and support of her mother, her son, her late husband, of friends and strangers - as well as the Gombe chimpanzees she introduced to the world nearly forty years ago. And she gives us convincing reasons why we can and must open ourselves to the saints within each of us."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
Member:Hinrichs
Title:Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey
Authors:Jane Goodall (Author)
Info:Grand Central Publishing (2000), Edition: Revised ed., 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey by Jane Goodall

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 15 mentions

English (14)  Tagalog (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
I really love optimists; I think they're some of the best people. When you combine optimism with realism, I think you get the very best. That's what Jane Goodall gives us with this book. ( )
  littlebookjockey | Sep 15, 2020 |
I listened to the audio format of this book and had a pleasurable experience. I felt as if the balance between science, memoir, and reflection on spiritual matters had a fairly good balance. This wasn't a grand experience filled with relation and growth for me as a reader, but it was a good look into life, emotion, and feeling of someone I respect very much. Readers who know something of Goodall's life probably won't be surprised by the events mentioned here, but will likely enjoy the glimpse into her life events and the emotions those things brought to her life. ( )
  mirrani | Jun 24, 2017 |
I enjoyed this book. Of course, I had heard of Jane Goodall and her foundation but didn't realize that her passion is driven from a spiritual base. The story of her life is amazing to me, especially as I learned that she really just ventured out to Africa to fulfill a dream with no real training to do what she hoped to do.

I was challenged by the way she weaves together her spiritual understanding of creation with her scientific understanding of evolution ... not just physical, but also social and moral.

The purpose of her book can be summed up by a quote toward the end where she says … "every human, every unique being, plays some role in the shaping of progress, though only some get into history books. Throughout every second of every day there is change abroad in the world, change due to the impact of mind on mind; teacher and pupil, parent and child, world leader and citizen, writer or actor and the general public. Each one of us carries seeds for change. Seeds that need nurturing to realize their potential." (p. 203) ( )
  MarkPlunkett | Aug 3, 2016 |
The book is by the famous anthropologist Jane Goodall, whose studies of chimpanzees revolutionized how we think of our closest relative among living species and thus how we define being human. Her title signals this book is about a lot more than that groundbreaking work. This was found in the Nature section of my neighborhood bookstore, but was recommended to me as "inspirational non-fiction" on the Ultimate Reading List. Her credited co-author Philip Berman is a theologian and the project was first conceived as "a book of interviews--questions from a theologian to an anthropologist."

Reading this I could have wished for a lot more of the anthropological and less of the spiritual. This memoir of her experiences had its pleasures and moving moments. I loved the story about how Louis Leakey recruited Goodall, who at the time had never attended a university, to go off to study chimpanzees in the wild. And I certainly found moving her story about the death of her husband from cancer. I thought she was at her best though in chapters such as "The Roots of Evil," "Precursors to War" and "Compassion and Love" when she spoke directly out of her study and observations of chimpanzees. But there's a lot in her moral, political and spiritual outlook I find antithetical to mine that made it hard at times to hear her out. Frequently I found myself irritated, and found myself skimming large parts of chapters. I frankly squirmed reading about her psychic experiences. Her style is lucid enough, but having recently read Isak Dinesen's Out of Africa, Goodall's prose did strike me in comparison as prosaic--this isn't a memoir you read out of literary merit. And when it came to so many of her political and spiritual views, there was so little I felt I hadn't heard many times before--that didn't feel like boilerplate. It's because there was so much in the book I couldn't take seriously, things outside the scope of her expertise, that despite fascinating bits in the book I can't rate this higher.

Was there any point in her arguments on issues I disagreed with where she got through to me? Interestingly, yes. Primarily in the Chapter "On the Road to Damascus" regarding animal research. I think it's significant that this was an issue where I didn't feel she was just repeating what many others had said. Her experiences observing chimpanzees, and her discussion of the cruelty of how they're treated in laboratories--ones she actually visited--resonated. Precisely because she spoke with the authority of direct experience. She also deflected a lot of my defenses by admitting the good that animal research had done; her own mother is alive because of animal research and the pig valve implanted in her heart. Yes, Goodall would like to someday eliminate animal experimentation, but the thrust of her argument was for treating the animals in laboratories as humanely as possible, and looking for alternatives. She didn't give anything like the PETA line that "A rat is a pig is a dog is a boy." And she gained my respect because of how she related how she actually sat down with researchers and worked with them to better the conditions of research animals--she didn't just hurl rhetorical bricks from outside the walls. So besides the fascinating look here and there at the experiences of a pioneering women in the study of primates, I learned a little about what it is that can break down resistance to truly considering the other side of an argument. And despite my disagreements with Goodall, at the finish of her book she had my admiration, liking and respect. ( )
1 vote LisaMaria_C | Jan 14, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Vanne, Judy, and all my wonderful family.
And in vivid memory of Danny, Derek, Louis, Rusty, and David Greybeard
First words
Many years ago, in the spring of 1974, I visited the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris.
Quotations
Herein lies the real hope for our future--we are moving toward the ultimate destiny of our species--a state of compassion and love. (p. 251)
...the uniquely human ability to talk about that which is not present, share events of the distant past, plan for the far-off future, and, most important, discuss ideas, bouncing them back and forth to share the accumulated wisdom of an entire group...to aritculate feelings of awe, feelings that would lead to religious belief... (p.188)
Each one of us matters, has a role to play, and makes a difference. Each one of us must take responsibility for our own lives, and above all, show respect and love for living things around us, especially each other. (p.266-7)
How sad it would be...if we humans ultimately were to lose all sense of mystery, all sense of awe. If our left brains were utterly to dominate the right so that logic and reason triumphed over intuition and alienated us absolutely from our innermost being, from our hearts, our souls. (p.177)
...it honestly didn't matter how we humans got to be the way we are, whether evolution or special creation was responsible. What mattered and mattered desperately was our future development...were we going to find ways to live in greater harmony with each other and with the natural world? (p.179)
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"Dr. Jane Goodall's revolutionary study of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe preserve forever altered the very, definition of "humanity." Now, in a poignant and insightful memoir, Jane Goodall explores her extraordinary life and personal spiritual odyssey, with observations as profound as the knowledge she has brought back from the forest." "It has been a life blessed with faith, resolve, and purpose, though not without its crises. Jane Goodall endured the horrors of the London blitz and World War II, postwar hardships, vicious rumors and "establishment" assaults on the integrity of her work, a terrorist attack and hostage taking in Africa, and her husband's slow, agonizing death. But throughout, her religious convictions, although tested, have helped her survive - and Jane Goodall's pursuit of science has enhanced, not eroded, her belief in God." "In this book she candidly shares her life - talking of the love and support of her mother, her son, her late husband, of friends and strangers - as well as the Gombe chimpanzees she introduced to the world nearly forty years ago. And she gives us convincing reasons why we can and must open ourselves to the saints within each of us."--BOOK JACKET.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 2
3 25
3.5 3
4 45
4.5 5
5 38

Hachette Book Group

3 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0446676136, 0446522252, 159483122X

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,766,130 books! | Top bar: Always visible