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God's Bestseller: William Tyndale, Thomas…
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God's Bestseller: William Tyndale, Thomas More, and the Writing of the…

by Brian Moynahan

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A useful counterpoint to the notion of the bible being a direct divinely written timeless document. This traces the struggles for the Tyndale English translation which was to go on and form 80% of the king James or authorised versions. Had Thomas More succeeded in tracking down Tyndale earlier then a very different English bible may have emerged. ( )
  ablueidol | Nov 8, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312314868, Hardcover)

The English Bible---the mot familiar book in our language---is the product of a man who was exiled, vilified, betrayed, then strangled, then burnt.

William Tyndale left England in 1524 to translate the word of God into English. This was heresy, punishable by death. Sir Thomas More, hailed as a saint and a man for all seasons, considered it his divine duty to pursue Tyndale. He did so with an obsessive ferocity that, in all probability, led to Tyndale's capture and death.

The words that Tyndale wrote during his desperate exile have a beauty and familiarity that still resonate across the English-speaking world: "Death, where is thy sting?...eat, drink, and be merry...our Father which art in heaven."

His New Testament, which he translated, edited, financed, printed, and smuggled into England in 1526, passed with few changes into subsequent versions of the Bible. So did those books of the Old Testament that he lived to finish.

Brian Moynahan's lucid and meticulously researched biography illuminates Tyndale's life, from his childhood in England, to his death outside Brussels. It chronicles the birth pangs of the Reformation, the wrath of Henry VIII, the sympathy of Anne Boleyn, and the consuming malice of Thomas More. Above all, it reveals the English Bible as a labor of love, for which a man in an age more spiritual than our own willingly gave his life.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:24:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

William Tyndale left England in 1524 to translate the word of God into English. This was heresy, punishable by death. Sir Thomas More, hailed as a saint and a man for all seasons, considered it his divine duty to pursue Tyndale. He did so with an obsessive ferocity that, in all probability, led to Tyndale's capture and death. The words that Tyndale wrote during his desperate exile--his New Testament, which he translated, edited, financed, printed, and smuggled into England in 1526--passed with few changes into subsequent versions of the Bible. Brian Moynahan's biography illuminates Tyndale's life, chronicling the birth pangs of the Reformation, the wrath of Henry VIII, the sympathy of Anne Boleyn, and the consuming malice of Thomas More. Above all, it reveals the English Bible as a labor of love, for which a man in an age more spiritual than our own willingly gave his life.--From publisher description.… (more)

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