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Vannet by Arnaldur Indriðason,
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1,018None8,330 (3.86)58
Member:MagnusEnger
Title:Vannet
Authors:Arnaldur Indriðason,
Other authors:Silje Beite Løken (Overs.), Ivar Nørve (Innl.)
Info:[Oslo] : Cappelen Damm, 2008
Collections:Read in 2010
Rating:
Tags:fiction, crime, iceland

Work details

The Draining Lake by Arnaldur Indriðason (2004)

Recently added bybwright2004, private library, TCK, alvahe, thebigdanilla, pclibrary1, il.g.n.madsen, whwatson
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» See also 58 mentions

English (32)  Dutch (3)  German (2)  Norwegian (2)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (43)
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
When detective Erlendur and his colleagues find another dead body at the bottom of a drained lake the traces lead back to the era of Cold War and the students of Leipzig, East Germany. ( )
  TheCrow2 | Jan 17, 2014 |
not the thriller I was looking for but still a good mystery in a reflective kind of way. Cold war remnants are brought b ack to life as Erlunder figures out who the dead body is in the lake. The action is passive in nature and the characters are interesting.
( )
  KarenRinn | Nov 2, 2013 |
This is the third of Indridason's books that I have read and it was definitely the best of the bunch. I will be looking for more of his work! The only fault I found was that the relationship between Erlendur and his children was introduced but not fully developed...perhaps this will come in a future volume? ( )
  Jcambridge | Nov 2, 2013 |
An earthquake near an Icelandic lake causes part of the lake to drain and a skeleton is discovered attached to some Soviet listening devices, presumably dating from the Cold War.. Detective Erlendur Sveinsson (The Jar City) has his own problems with a daughter constantly getting into trouble, a son who resents his aloofness, and his own periodic and obsessive search for a brother gone missing many years before in a snowstorm. He and his colleagues try to track down the identity of the dead man, but no one wants to revisit the Cold War times, especially one in which idealistic socialist Icelandic students succumbed to the blandishments of Soviet agents seeking to spy on a country that many called “an American aircraft carrier.”

The skeleton was found with an antiquated spy machine tied around it as a weight. Unlike most Icelandic murders, which were easier to solve, this one, appeared to have been carefully planned, skilfully executed, and had remained covered up for so many years. Icelandic murders were not generally committed in this way. They were more coincidental, clumsy and squalid, and the perpetrators almost without exception left a trail of clues.

Erlendur continues his attempts at reconciliation with his daughter Eva who has been in and out of drug rehab and hospitals. (She a recurring character in all three of the Erlendur novels I have read adding to his -- and the reader’s -- despair.) The images conjured up in my mind were all in black and white. No color anywhere.

Iceland, as portrayed in these novels, remains inhospitable to the reader, and discourses on the Icelandic diet don’t make me want to rush to O’Hare and grab the first IcelandicAir to Reykjavik.

'What monstrosity is that?' she asked, pointing to a boiled sheep's head on the table, still uneaten. 'A sheep's head, sawn in half and charred,' he said, and saw her wince. 'What sort of people do that?' she asked. 'Icelanders,' he said. 'Actually it's very good,' he added rather hesitantly. 'The tongue and the cheeks . . .' He stopped when he realised that it did not sound particularly appetising. 'So, you eat the eyes and lips too?' she asked, not trying to conceal her disgust. 'The lips? Yes, those too. And the eyes.'

The gloom of these novels was summed up nicely by the discovery of an older woman, seated in front of her television, a plate of salted meat and boiled turnips was on the table beside her. A knife and fork lay on the floor by the chair. A large lump of meat was lodged in her throat. She had not managed to get out of the deep armchair. Her face was dark blue. It turned out that she had no relatives who called on her. No one ever visited her. No one missed her. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
This sixth book in Indriðason's Erlendur series has a style of writing similar to his award-winning fourth book [book:Silence of the Grave] in its layering of past and present, but this time the past is the Cold War days of the 1950s and '60s. Not just a good mystery, this novel shows the reader a glimpse of life in East Germany during the time of Hungary's doomed rebellion in the mid-1950s when "interactive surveillance" was becoming the norm.

Although I wouldn't classify this as a thriller, I had a hard time putting it down once I started reading. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 26, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Realistically told, emotionally charged, and brimming with compassion, The Draining Lake is likely to challenge the reader’s values system. For this reviewer, at least, Indridason’s latest English-translated novel is one of the highlights of 2007. Although it’s full of pathos, the book also makes clear just how strong the human spirit is, and reminds us that the flip-side of friendship is far from pleasant. It can sometimes be hard to distinguish comrade from foe -- a person can be both at the same time....I wait patiently for the next Arnaldur Indridason/Bernard Scudder collaboration to arrive in bookstores. This is crime fiction at its most insightful, poetic and poignant

 
Indridason's novels are an undiluted pleasure....this series places Indridason at the centre of the best of contemporary crime fiction. He is a master storyteller, and has a real gift for evoking the complex humanity at the heart of the most dour-seeming individuals.
 
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Slaap maar, ik ben dol op je (uit een volksliedje)
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She stood motionless for a long time, staring at the bones as if it should not be possible for them to be there. Any more than for her.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312428588, Paperback)

Inspector Erlendur returns in this international Bestseller

Following an earthquake, the water level of an Icelandic lake suddenly falls, revealing a skeleton. Inspector Erlendur's investigation takes him back to the Cold War era, when bright, left-wing students in Iceland were sent to study in the "heavenly state" of Communist East Germany. Teeming with spies and informants, though, their "heavenly state" becomes a nightmare of betrayal and murder. Brilliantly weaving international espionage and a chilling cold case investigation, The Draining Lake is Arnaldur Indridason at his best.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:31:55 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Following an earthquake, the water level of an Icelandic lake suddenly falls, revealing a skeleton. Inspector Erlendur's investigation takes him back to the cold war era, when bright, left-wing students in Iceland were sent to study in the "heavenly state" of Communist East Germany. Teeming with spies and informants, though, their "heavenly state" becomes a nightmare of betrayal and murder. Brilliantly weaving international espionage and a chilling cold-case investigation, The Draining Lake is Arnaldur Indri?ason at his best.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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